I Never Met a Story I Didn't Like

Mostly True Tall Tales

I Never Met a Story I Didn't Like

For years, Todd Snider has been one of the most beloved country-folk singers in the United States. He had a Top 40 hit with “Talking Seattle Grunge Rock Blues,” which gave national audiences the first taste of his insightful songwriting, at once satirical and sincere. Hailed by critics as one of the top albums of 2004, East Nashville Skyline was followed by The Devil You Know and The Excitement Plan. Snider's songs took on George W. Bush and America's recent involvement in foreign war, along with a host of more intimate topics. As good as Snider's albums have been, his in-concert monologues are even better. His shows are a loose-limbed, informal experience: it's often just him and a guitar. He introduces songs with stories that can run as long as twenty minutes, always displaying his charm and wit. As he's allowed his storytelling to evolve along with his music, Snider has become not only a modern day Bob Dylan but a modern day Will Rogers as well—an everyman whose intelligence, self deprecation, experience, and, above all, humor make him a uniquely American character.

I Never Met a Dog I Didn't Like:

True Entertaining and Educational Stories About Rescue Dogs and Cats

I Never Met a Dog I Didn't Like:

This book details the true stories of the author’s and her husband’s many dogs and cats—from Lizzie, who loved to be dressed up as a witch and give out Halloween treats--to Lucky, whose life was saved just in time--to Anton, who survived distemper, a disease that kills many dogs and cats. All of the animals featured in this book came from animal rescue groups and shelters, with most of them coming from out-of-state kill shelters. For the most part, these animals had problematic behaviors, and were adults, except for the two puppies, Lucky and Anton. Some of these animals growled as their main form of communication to both humans and dogs alike and many of the male dogs marked or were incontinent indoors. Most of the animals needed obedience and leash training, and some dogs exhibited aggression over food, toys, and space. The growling, marking, lack of obedience to basic commands, absence of leash training, and aggressive tendencies all had made these otherwise good-natured animals unattractive to potential and first-time adopters. Another issue that surfaced was the fact that black animals are often overlooked or even avoided by adopters. The chapter, entitled “Ashley, the Black Dog,” addresses this unfortunate and widespread prejudice toward black dogs and cats. The author found that it was extremely rewarding to adopt rescue dogs. Although they were difficult at times, she found them to be interesting, challenging, and loveable. She also felt that they had taught her a lot about how to handle dogs with their particular problems. The author also loved adopting the less complicated dogs—the ones who just eat, play, sleep, and lick your hand—like Ashley, Lucky, Pooky, and Gumby. These dogs may not have been the most intelligent dogs, but because of their gentle natures, they got along well with, and balanced out, the author’s more difficult and aggressive dogs.

I Never Met a Train I Didn't Like

The Art and Enjoyment of Collecting Toy Trains

I Never Met a Train I Didn't Like

Toy collectors are like a group of fifth graders on a scavenger hunt... If you notice the expression on the faces of the guys as they walk around a train show or first enter a train store you'll see the excitement and anticipation of a great "find." I refer to them as fifth graders because that time of life impressed me as an age of innocence, when nothing else was on your mind but what you were searching for. Collectors all but revert to that time of life when they search for a new item for their train world. This wonderful feeling and sense of care free enthusiasm captures the essence of this book. It includes many stories related to these times of collecting enjoyment and also reminiscent of days gone by, and when all was good with the world and we were all just kids... Keep Searchin'

Selected Film Essays and Interviews

Selected Film Essays and Interviews

This engaging collection of Bruce F. Kawin’s most important film essays (1977–2011) is accompanied by his interviews with Lillian Gish (1978) and Howard Hawks (1976). The Hawks interview is particularly concerned with his work with William Faulkner and their friendship. The Gish interview emphasizes her role as a producer in the 1920s. The essays focus on such topics as violence and sexual politics in film, the relations between horror and science fiction, the growth of video and digital cinema and their effects on both film and film scholarship, the politics of film theory, narration in film, and the relations between film and literature. Among the most significant articles reprinted here are “Me Tarzan, You Junk,” “The Montage Element in Faulkner's Fiction,” “The Mummy’s Pool,” “The Whole World Is Watching,” and “Late Show on the Telescreen: Film Studies and the Bottom Line.” The book includes close readings of films from “La Jetée” to “The Wizard of Oz.”

Personal (with bonus short story Not a Drill)

A Jack Reacher Novel

Personal (with bonus short story Not a Drill)

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Jack Reacher returns in another fast-moving, action-packed, suspenseful book from Lee Child. You can leave the army, but the army doesn’t leave you. Not always. Not completely, notes Jack Reacher—and sure enough, the retired military cop is soon pulled back into service. This time, for the State Department and the CIA. Someone has taken a shot at the president of France in the City of Light. The bullet was American. The distance between the gunman and the target was exceptional. How many snipers can shoot from three-quarters of a mile with total confidence? Very few, but John Kott—an American marksman gone bad—is one of them. And after fifteen years in prison, he’s out, unaccounted for, and likely drawing a bead on a G8 summit packed with enough world leaders to tempt any assassin. If anyone can stop Kott, it’s the man who beat him before: Reacher. And though he’d rather work alone, Reacher is teamed with Casey Nice, a rookie analyst who keeps her cool with Zoloft. But they’re facing a rough road, full of ruthless mobsters, Serbian thugs, close calls, double-crosses—and no backup if they’re caught. All the while Reacher can’t stop thinking about the woman he once failed to save. But he won’t let that that happen again. Not this time. Not Nice. Reacher never gets too close. But now a killer is making it personal. BONUS: This edition includes the short story "Not a Drill" and an excerpt from Lee Child's Make Me. Praise for Personal “The best one yet.”—Stephen King “Reacher is the stuff of myth, a great male fantasy. . . . One of this century’s most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes . . . Child does a masterly job of bringing his adventure to life with endless surprises and fierce suspense.”—The Washington Post “Yet another satisfying page-turner.”—Entertainment Weekly “Reacher is always up for a good fight, most entertainingly when he goes mano a mano with a seven-foot, 300-pound monster of a mobster named Little Joey. But it’s Reacher the Teacher who wows here.”—Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times “Jack Reacher is today’s James Bond, a thriller hero we can’t get enough of. I read every one as soon as it appears.”—Ken Follett “Reacher’s just one of fiction’s great mysterious strangers.”—Maxim “If you like fast-moving thrillers, you’ll want to take a look at this one.”—John Sandford “Fans won’t be disappointed by this suspense-filled, riveting thriller.”—Library Journal (starred review) “Child is the alpha dog of thriller writers, each new book zooming to the top of best-seller lists with the velocity of a Reacher head butt.”—Booklist “Every Reacher novel delivers a jolt to the nervous system.”—Kirkus Reviews

The New York Stories

The New York Stories

Collected for the first time, the New York stories of John O'Hara, "among the greatest short story writers in English, or in any other language" (Brendan Gill, Here at The New Yorker) Collected for the first time, here are the New York stories of one of the twentieth century’s definitive chroniclers of the city—the speakeasies and highballs, social climbers and cinema stars, mistresses and powerbrokers, unsparingly observed by a popular American master of realism. Spanning his four-decade career, these more than thirty refreshingly frank, sparely written stories are among John O’Hara’s finest work, exploring the materialist aspirations and sexual exploits of flawed, prodigally human characters and showcasing the snappy dialogue, telling details and ironic narrative twists that made him the most-published short story writer in the history of the New Yorker. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Looks Can Be Deceiving

Looks Can Be Deceiving

Life is just time spent between bouts of self-pity and his next drink for Dirk Crandell, a salty small-town newspaper writer. Then an intriguing letter crosses his desk from a young woman in LA. What follows for Crandell is a life-changing series of twists and turns as the promise made to the young woman in the letter leads him into a web of conspiracy, deception, and deception. As he delves further into this small towns sinister series of events, some going back twenty years, he begins to unravel a cover-up of deadly proportions. Joining forces with his seductive managing editor, Kristen Harden, he discovers not only that Looks Can Be Deceiving but hazardous to your health as well.

A Single Raindrop

A Single Raindrop

"A Single Raindrop" is a collection of uncommon insights into our mannerisms, incongruities, language, and most of all our individuality. The author's observations, comments, and reflections on everything from life, lemons, colors, beauty and customs to foibles, teachers, time and history are sometimes funny, sometimes philosophical but always from a unique perspective. His reflections will make you feel good about yourself, your heritage and your individuality in "Without Doubt" and "There's More to You Than You Know." He will cause you to reflect on the silly aspects of our use of language in "Two Twins Are Four People", "A Word On Words", and "Punny Tales." You"ll smile as he defends the lemon, says "My Body is Not a Billboard" and when asked to "Count Your Foibles." And "Beauty","Life is Full of Chickens", "A Single Raindrop", and "Do Ants Have Music' will cause you to celebrate the joy of humanity.

The Black Ace

A Brad Shade Thriller

The Black Ace

Hatred, blackmail, and murder—a Brad Shade hat trick. The Black Ace reunites us with our favourite, savvy fourth-liner, with plot twists, wisecracks, and an ending that could only come from G.B. Joyce. Thanks to Shade’s work at the NHL draft last season, he gets to hold on to his job as scout for L.A.—at least for now. But a journeyman’s work is never done. Shade is checking out the talent in Regina with his old friend and teammate “Chief.” But when they learn of the suicide of an old teammate from their playing days in L.A., they take a sometimes violent detour through the dark side of a small town with no shortage of secrets it wants kept at almost any cost.

Stories About Storytellers

Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau and Others

Stories About Storytellers

The legendary Canadian book editor presents this “remarkable, four-decade romp through the back rooms of publishing.” —Toronto Sun Scottish-born Douglas Gibson was drawn to Canada by the writing of Stephen Leacock—and eventually made his way across the Atlantic to find a job in book publishing, where he edited a biography of none other than Leacock. But over the decades, his stellar career would lead him to work with many more of the country’s leading literary lights. This memoir shares stories of working—and playing—alongside writers including Robertson Davies, Mavis Gallant, Brian Mulroney, Val Ross, W. O. Mitchell, and many more. He reveals the projects he brainstormed for Barry Broadfoot; how he convinced future Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro to keep writing short stories; his early-morning phone call from a former prime minister; and his recollection of yanking a manuscript right out of Alistair MacLeod’s reluctant hands—which ultimately garnered MacLeod one of the world’s most prestigious prizes for fiction. Insightful and entertaining, this collection of tales goes behind the scenes and between the covers to divulge a treasure trove of literary adventures. “He makes his life in publishing sound like great fun.” —The Globe and Mail (Toronto)