How to Hide an Empire : A Short History of the Greater United States

How to Hide an Empire : A Short History of the Greater United States

For a country that has always denied having dreams of empire; the United States owns a lot of overseas territory. America has always prided itself on being a champion of sovereignty and independence. We know it has spread its money; language and culture across the world - but we still think of it as a contained territory; framed by Canada above; Mexico below; and oceans either side. Nothing could be further from the truth.How to Hide an Empire tells the story of the United States outside the United States - from nineteenth-century conquests like Alaska; Hawai`i; the Philippines and Puerto Rico; to the catalogue of islands; archipelagos and military bases dotted around the globe over which the Stars and Stripes flies. Many are thousands of miles from the mainland; all are central to its history.But the populations of these territories; despite being subject to America's government; cannot vote for it; they have often fought America's wars; but they do not enjoy the rights of full citizens. These forgotten episodes cast American history; and its present; in a revealing new light. The birth control pill; chemotherapy; plastic; Godzilla; the Beatles; the name America itself - you can't understand the histories of any of thesewithout understanding territorial empire. Full of surprises; and driven by an original conception of what empire and globalisation mean today; How to Hide an Empire is a major and compulsively readable work of history.

International Status in the Shadow of Empire

Nauru and the Histories of International Law

International Status in the Shadow of Empire

This book offers a new account of Nauru's imperial history and examines its significance in the history of international law.

We Built Reality

How Social Science Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power

We Built Reality

Over the last fifty years, pseudoscience has crept into nearly every facet of our lives. Popular sciences of everything from dating and economics, to voting and artificial intelligence, radically changed the world today. The abuse of popular scientific authority has catastrophic consequences, contributing to the 2008 financial crisis; the failure to predict the rise of Donald Trump; increased tensions between poor communities and the police; and the sidelining of nonscientific forms of knowledge and wisdom. In We Built Reality, Jason Blakely explains how recent social science theories have not simply described political realities but also helped create them. But he also offers readers a way out of the culture of scientism: hermeneutics, or the art of interpretation. Hermeneutics urges sensitivity to the historical and cultural contexts of human behavior. It gives ordinary people a way to appreciate the insights of the humanities in guiding decisions. As Blakely contends, we need insights from the humanities to see how social science theories never simply neutrally describe reality, they also help build it.

Family Secrets

Living with Shame from the Victorians to the Present Day

Family Secrets

A Sunday Telegraph and Times Higher Education 'Book of the Week', Deborah Cohen's Family Secrets is a gripping book about what families - Victorian and modern - try to hide, and why. In an Edinburgh town house, a genteel maiden lady frets with her brother over their niece's downy upper lip. Would the darkening shadow betray the girl's Eurasian heritage? On a Liverpool railway platform, a heartbroken mother hands over her eight-year old illegitimate son for adoption. She had dressed him carefully that morning in a sailor suit and cap. In a town in the Cotswolds, a vicar brings to his bank vault a diary - sewed up in calico, wrapped in parchment - that chronicles his sexual longings for other men. Drawing upon years of research in previously sealed records, the prize-winning historian Deborah Cohen offers a sweeping and often surprising account of how shame has changed over the last two centuries. Both a story of family secrets and of how they were revealed, this book journeys from the frontier of empire, where British adventurers made secrets that haunted their descendants for generations, to the confessional vanguard of modern-day genealogy two centuries later. It explores personal, apparently idiosyncratic, decisions: hiding an adopted daughter's origins, taking a disabled son to a garden party, talking ceaselessly (or not at all) about a homosexual uncle. In delving into the familial dynamics of shame and guilt, Family Secrets investigates the part that families, so often regarded as the agents of repression, have played in the transformation of social mores from the Victorian era to the present day. Written with compassion and keen insight, this is a bold new argument about the sea-changes that took place behind closed doors. Born into a family with its own fair share of secrets, Deborah Cohen was raised in Kentucky and educated at Harvard and Berkeley.She teaches at Northwestern University, where she holds the Peter B. Ritzma Professorship of the Humanities.Her last book was the award-winning Household Gods, a history of the British love-affair with the home.

The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire

The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire

Determined to discover his father's identity, Merlin, along with his band of loyal companions, travels across war-ravaged Europe, a trip that cements his reputation as a great healer.

The Fall of an Empire

The Fall of an Empire

The novel took a leap into the future, and through various scenes exposed the appalling conditions of humankind. The people were mired in debt and misery, as they succumbed under the oppressive regimes of the various world governments. The destiny of many nations was doomed by one menacing power. However, the deplorable hardship was eventually brought to the attention of God. The cries of the people were eventually heard! The Divine court was not indifferent, and the issue was indeed brought forth. God, then assigned benevolent Tabriel, the protagonist, the task of determining the guilty and bring them to justice. Tabriel on his part travelled to Earth and began his investigation, he came across Ibleece, the antagonist. Tabriel then uncovered the mystery behind the Empire of the Money Monopoly. Tabriel found it to be in full control of the affairs of humankind, thus responsible for much of the prevailing mischief. However, the people were unaware! Tabriel concluded that via the formidable deception, practiced by Ibleece, the Empire attained its menacing might. Tabriel, nonetheless, decided to confront Ibleece and his Empire. He initiated a battle, sparking a revolution, which toppled the menacing Empire of Ibleece.

Fishers of Men Or Founders of Empire?

The Wycliffe Bible Translators in Latin America

Fishers of Men Or Founders of Empire?


The Language of Empire

Abu Ghraib and the American Media

The Language of Empire

Under the rule of Saddam Hussein, the prison of Abu Ghraib (the Father of the Raven) was a place of ill omen, notorious for horrific suffering and torture and mass executions. After the invasion of Iraq, the U.S. military made Abu Ghraib one of the major detention centers for Iraqis suspected of sympathizing with the resistance. The revelations since April 2004 of systematic torture and sexual humiliation of Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib have not easily been assimilated into the mythology of the U.S. “war on terror.” The Language of Empire focuses on the response to these revelations in the U.S. media, in congress, and in the larger context of U.S. global politics and ideology. Its focus on the media is a prelude to showing how the language of multiculturalism, humanitarianism, and even feminism have been hijacked in the cause of an illegal and brutal imperialist war. The media have colluded with the Bush administration in manipulating images of the U.S. occupation of Iraq in such a way as to present it as a clash between civilization and barbarism, and in selectively using legal and procedural issues to distract from the basic criminality of the invasion itself. The circuitous logic through which U.S. imperialism presents itself as a defender of legality and democracy is exposed for all to see in this important and timely work.

Twilight Of Empire

Responses To Occupation

Twilight Of Empire

Activists, ambassadors, and award-winning journalists offer their incisive analysis of the American occupation of Iraq in this timely collection of essays, featuring the arresting photography of Lynsey Addario. Topics include American economic interests in the war, the mainstream media coverage that made it politically feasible, escalating abuse of Muslim women by both American troops and an increasingly fundamentalist Middle East citizenry, the profiteering of multinationals like Halliburton and Bechtel, and more. A bevy of contributors includes Medea Benjamin, Kristina Borjesson, Amy Goodman, Amir Hussain, Naomi Klein, Mark LeVine, Yanar Mohammed, Viggo Mortensen, and Ambassador Joseph Wilson. Includes color photos throughout.