How to Grow a Giant Brain (of Doom!)

How to Grow a Giant Brain (of Doom!)

What is learning? What does it mean to be knowledgeable? Prepare to grow a giant brain as you discover more about learning itself. In a time where rote memorization and passing tests is still common in education, take a step back, open your mind, and think about what else will empower 21st Century citizens. Free resources that complement this book (including IB Learner Profile posters) are available at http: //www.ed-ucation.ca/knowledgeable.html To order class sets, grade level sets, or school sets, visit the Bookstore at www.ED-ucation.ca

Learning Difficulties: Is Your Doom Sealed?

Learning Difficulties: Is Your Doom Sealed?

CHILDREN'S DIFFICULTIES COULD BE ALLEVIATED and/or ELIMINATED PRIOR TO PRE-SCHOOL AGE. The number of children suffering developmental and learning difficulties is growing by the day. Developmental and Learning Difficulties are not generated in school instead, the child is born with it. This is the story of special toddlers, including my own child, that were able to overcome major difficulties while implementing my innovative model. Developmental and Learning Difficulties are detectable and treatable in infancy. The brain triples its weight during the first year of life. This 'window of opportunity' for neuro-pathways building is open from birth to one year of age. The proper intervention at this critical time will certainly mean a different quality of life for a child. This book is a review of early intervention programs around the world and the presentation of my innovation to the field of education. An innovation parents could have known about four years ago if only...

Growing Up in the House of Doom

Growing Up in the House of Doom

Patt Gavin grew up as the third child in a family of nine, mostly boys. Along with his six brothers, they spent their childhood doing the things most boys do: catching animals, making messes and terrorizing their sisters. Growing Up In The House Of Doom is a collection of stories from a time gone by, when life was simpler, and children actually spent time outdoors playing with other children in a real-life setting. A time when children walked or rode their bikes to little league games, and knew it was time to come home when the street lamps came on.Enjoy these memories of a group of boys who enjoyed their childhoods to the fullest, in spite of the objections of their sisters.

The Civilian

A Monthly Journal Devoted to Civil Polity, Legal Miscellany, Political Science, and Literature

The Civilian


Between Redemption and Doom

The Strains of German-Jewish Modernism

Between Redemption and Doom

Between Redemption and Doom is a revelatory exploration of the evolution of German-Jewish modernism. Through an examination of selected works in literature, theory, and film, Noah Isenberg investigates the ways in which Jewish identity was represented in German culture from the eve of the First World War through the rise of National Socialism. He argues that various responses to modernity?particularly to its social, cultural, and aesthetic currents?converge around the discourse on community: its renaissance, its crisis, and its dissolution. ø Isenberg opens with a general discussion of German modernism?its primary forms, movements, and manifestations. Subsequent chapters on Franz Kafka and Arnold Zweig deal with particular instances of the modern, and often ambivalent, search for forms of German-Jewish identity based on cultural and ethnic community. Discussions of Paul Wegener?s film Der Golem and Walter Benjamin?s childhood memoirs explore the culmination of German modernism and the modes through which Jews were identified in mass society. Throughout, Isenberg shows how Jewish authors and figures confronted the dilemma of self-understanding?the exigencies of community in the modern world?in language, culture, memory, and representation.

Doomtime

Doomtime

It all began when someone tried to push Creed into the flesh pool to be ingested. The assassination failed, but Creed was never the same again. Because it launched the new cliff-dwellers of Creed's colony onto a new course of life - which could lead to humanity's re-emergence as Earth's masters. In those far future days, Earth's masters were two trees. Not trees as we know them, but two Everest-high growths, whose sentient roots and fast-growing branches dominated every living thing on the world. Men lived between their arboreal combat.

Point Doom

Point Doom

From Dan Fante, the son of novelist John Fante, comes a gritty detective novel featuring JD Fiorella, an ex-private investigator who's bent on avenging his friend's murder. Failed private investigator JD Fiorella was a pro at finding trouble. Mixing it up with the wrong people in New York, he escaped to L.A.—only to hit rock-bottom after too many nightmares and too much booze. Now forty-six and sober, JD is working hard to get it together. Living in Malibu at his mother's house in Point Dume, he's got a new job selling used cars with his friend Woody and a new girlfriend. But just as things are looking up, JD discovers a gruesome murder. Now the ex-private detective has to make a choice. Determined to exact vengeance, he follows a twisting trail of clues that leads him to unexpected truths about himself and his new life—and to a psychopathic killer with an eerie connection to his past. And, as JD soon learns, this time there's no easy way out.

A History of Cornell

A History of Cornell

Cornell University is fortunate to have as its historian a man of Morris Bishop's talents and devotion. As an accurate record and a work of art possessing form and personality, his book at once conveys the unique character of the early university—reflected in its vigorous founder, its first scholarly president, a brilliant and eccentric faculty, the hardy student body, and, sometimes unfortunately, its early architecture—and establishes Cornell's wider significance as a case history in the development of higher education. Cornell began in rebellion against the obscurantism of college education a century ago. Its record, claims the author, makes a social and cultural history of modern America. This story will undoubtedly entrance Cornellians; it will also charm a wider public. Dr. Allan Nevins, historian, wrote: "I anticipated that this book would meet the sternest tests of scholarship, insight, and literary finish. I find that it not only does this, but that it has other high merits. It shows grasp of ideas and forces. It is graphic in its presentation of character and idiosyncrasy. It lights up its story by a delightful play of humor, felicitously expressed. Its emphasis on fundamentals, without pomposity or platitude, is refreshing. Perhaps most important of all, it achieves one goal that in the history of a living university is both extremely difficult and extremely valuable: it recreates the changing atmosphere of time and place. It is written, very plainly, by a man who has known and loved Cornell and Ithaca for a long time, who has steeped himself in the traditions and spirit of the institution, and who possesses the enthusiasm and skill to convey his understanding of these intangibles to the reader." The distinct personalities of Ezra Cornell and first president Andrew Dickson White dominate the early chapters. For a vignette of the founder, see Bishop's description of "his" first buildings (Cascadilla, Morrill, McGraw, White, Sibley): "At best," he writes, "they embody the character of Ezra Cornell, grim, gray, sturdy, and economical." To the English historian, James Anthony Froude, Mr. Cornell was "the most surprising and venerable object I have seen in America." The first faculty, chosen by President White, reflected his character: "his idealism, his faith in social emancipation by education, his dislike of dogmatism, confinement, and inherited orthodoxy"; while the "romantic upstate gothic" architecture of such buildings as the President's house (now Andrew D. White Center for the Humanities), Sage Chapel, and Franklin Hall may be said to "portray the taste and Soul of Andrew Dickson White." Other memorable characters are Louis Fuertes, the beloved naturalist; his student, Hugh Troy, who once borrowed Fuertes' rhinoceros-foot wastebasket for illicit if hilarious purposes; the more noteworthy and the more eccentric among the faculty of succeeding presidential eras; and of course Napoleon, the campus dog, whose talent for hailing streetcars brought him home safely—and alone—from the Penn game. The humor in A History of Cornell is at times kindly, at times caustic, and always illuminating.