Ancient Egyptian Literature

Ancient Egyptian Literature

First published in 1973, this anthology has assumed classic status in the field of Egyptology and portrays the remarkable evolution of the literary forms of one of the world’s earliest civilizations. Beginning with the early and gradual evolution of Egyptian genres, it includes biographical and historical inscriptions carved on stone, the various classes of works written with pen on papyrus, and the mortuary literature that focuses on life after death. It then shows the culmination of these literary genres within the single period known as the New Kingdom (1550–1080 B.C.) and ends in the last millennium of Pharaonic civilization, from the tenth century B.C. to the beginning of the Christian era. An introduction written in three parts by Antonio Loprieno, Hans-W. Fischer-Elfert, and Joseph G. Manning completes this classic anthology.

Record of Miraculous Events in Japan

The Nihon ryoiki

Record of Miraculous Events in Japan

The Nihon ryoiki, a collection of setsuwa, or "anecdotal" tales, compiled by a monk in late-eighth- or early-ninth-century Japan, records the spread of Buddhist ideas in Japan and the ways in which Buddhism's principles were adapted to the conditions of Japanese society. Beginning in the time before Buddhism was introduced to Japan, the text captures the effects of the nation's initial contact with Buddhism—brought by emissaries from the king of the Korean state of Paekche—and the subsequent adoption and dissemination of these new teachings in Japanese towns and cities. The Nihon ryoiki provides a crucial window into the ways in which Japanese Buddhists began to make sense of the teachings and texts of their religion, incorporate religious observances and materials from Korea and China, and articulate a popularized form of Buddhist practice and belief that could extend beyond monastic centers. The setsuwa genre would become one of the major textual projects of classical and medieval Buddhism, with nearly two dozen collections appearing over the next five centuries. The Nihon ryoiki serves as a vital reference for these later works, with the tales it contains finding their way into folkloric traditions and becoming a major source for Japanese authors well into the modern period.

Lord of the Silent

Lord of the Silent

Undeterred by world war and enemy submarines, Amelia and Emerson set sail once again for Egypt, where ghosts of an ancient past and spectres of a present-day evil hover silently over an inscrutable land. In the autumn of 1915 Cairo is transformed into an army camp teeming with enemy agents and shockingly bold tomb robbers are brazenly desecrating the ancient sites. Amelia seeks refuge at a remote dig in Luxor, but this provides no guarantee of safety when she discovers a fresh corpse in an ancient tomb. But are the Emersons in even darker danger with the intervention of one of Amelia's oldest and most dangerous adversaries? Tanatalising clues suggest this might be so, and point towards an archaelogical discovery of unparalleled importance - and the resurrection of a voice that has been silent for milennia.

Seahorse in the Sky

Seahorse in the Sky

At first he though it was all part of some crazy nightmare. But it wasn't. Russell Graheme, M.P. was one of a handful of passengers flying from Stockholm to London. One moment flying peacefully in the sky, the next lying in an un-Earthly green coffin. Grahame was the first to emerge from this strange resting place. But for him, as well as for the others, it had been only the ecliptical experience. Soon all were to find themselves lost in a bizarre world of Mediaeval knights, Stone Age warriors and gremlins, caught unalterably in the weirdest cocoon of Time.

Farewell, Thunder Moon

Farewell, Thunder Moon

The Thunder Moon series represents some of Max Brand?s best work, originally published in 1927?28 as a series of interlocking stories. The University of Nebraska Press is now republishing these stories uncut and in the sequence Faust intended, with careful reference to the original typescripts. In order, the works appear in four volumes as The Legend of Thunder Moon, Red Wind and Thunder Moon, Thunder Moon and the Sky People, and Farewell, Thunder Moon. Farewell, Thunder Moon originally appeared in 1928 in Western Story Magazine. In this work, Thunder Moon is betrayed yet again and forced to flee his newly found home among those from whom he was abducted as a child. Returning to the plains that have been the scene of his greatest exploits, he finds the shadows of the encroaching whites lengthening on the lodges of his people. Forced, in order to preserve his people, to make choices that they cannot understand, Thunder Moon must again confront his hereditary enemy, the Pawnees, as well as the oncoming whites. But soon Thunder Moon?s greatest test draws nigh, and he must find where his heart truly lies.