The Changing Image of the City

Planning for Downtown Omaha, 1945-1973

The Changing Image of the City

The Changing Image of the City describes urban planning and development from the end of World War II to 1973, when major elements of the design of Nebraska's largest city were in place. Janet Daly-Bednarek shows how the appraches to planning shifted during a period that saw Omaha change from a hub of food processing and transportation to a postindustrial center dominated by insurance and by educational, medical, and other services. Finally, she surveys recent developments such as the Central Park Mall and the Old Market area in light of earlier plans and their implementation. In considering the changes that have occurred in Omaha, this book reveals much about the growth of professional urban planning in America. In Omaha, as elsewhere, planners dealt with power brokers, coped with rampant suburbanism and sprawling shopping malls, searched for ways to reverse the inner-city decay, and concerned themselves with historic preservation, beautification, and quality of life.

The Leeser Bible

The Leeser Bible

Rabbi Isaac Leeser (1806-1868) of Philadelphia was responsible for the first Jewish translation of the Bible made for American Jewry. Leeser's considerable learning in matters biblical and rabbinic derived in major measure from the fine research then flowering in Germany, and his translation of the Bible became in a short time the standard Bible for English-speaking Jews in America. I originally put this edition together, edited it and published it as a gift to my own father, who loves this Bible version.

The Adventures of Odysseus and The Tale of Troy

The Adventures of Odysseus and The Tale of Troy

Retelling of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey for young readers recalls the horrid Cyclops, treacherous Sirens, and the evil Circe as they attempt to keep Odysseus from his wife, Penelope. 16 black-and-white illustrations.

Coming into the Country

Coming into the Country

Coming into the Country is an unforgettable account of Alaska and Alaskans. It is a rich tapestry of vivid characters, observed landscapes, and descriptive narrative, in three principal segments that deal, respectively, with a total wilderness, with urban Alaska, and with life in the remoteness of the bush. Readers of McPhee's earlier books will not be unprepared for his surprising shifts of scene and ordering of events, brilliantly combined into an organic whole. In the course of this volume we are made acquainted with the lore and techniques of placer mining, the habits and legends of the barren-ground grizzly, the outlook of a young Athapaskan chief, and tales of the fortitude of settlers—ordinary people compelled by extraordinary dreams. Coming into the Country unites a vast region of America with one of America's notable literary craftsmen, singularly qualified to do justice to the scale and grandeur of the design.

The Last Chronicle of Barset

The Last Chronicle of Barset

(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed) The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867) is the novel that Anthony Trollope considered his masterpiece. In the course of the last century and a half, Trollope’s county of Barset has become one of English literature’s most celebrated fictional landscapes. This sixth and final novel in the Barsetshire series revolves around the proud, hardworking, and impecunious Reverend Josiah Crawley, curate of the poor parish of Hogglestock, and his brush with disaster. Crawley stands accused of a theft, but, as he is uncertain himself as to the truth of the matter, he is unable to offer a defense and retreats into self-doubt and shame. The community is bitterly divided between those who wish to help him and those convinced of his guilt, the latter headed by Mrs. Proudie, the bishop’s forceful wife. Meanwhile, Crawley’s daughter Grace has captured the affection of Archdeacon Grantly’s son, Henry, but her father’s scandal stands in the way of their marriage. The solution to the mystery, the downfall of Mrs. Proudie, and the resolution of the fates of many other beloved characters, including Septimus Harding, Johnny Eames, and Lily Dale, bring the famous Barsetshire chronicles to a splendid conclusion. The Last Chronicle of Barset provides a brilliant example of Trollope’s ability to render a highly individual society with such detail and force that it comes to reflect every society, in any age.

John Calvin's Commentaries On The Harmony Of The Gospels Vol. 3

John Calvin's Commentaries On The Harmony Of The Gospels Vol. 3

This is the extended and annotated edition including * an extensive biographical annotation about the author and his life Calvin produced commentaries on most of the books of the Bible. His commentaries cover the larger part of the Old Testament, and all of the new excepting Second and Third John and the Apocalypse. His commentaries and lectures stand in the front rank of Biblical interpretation. Our Author has exerted a powerful influence on all succeeding expositors. They have found their interest in listening to his instructions, and have been more deeply indebted to him than is generally known. Many valuable interpretations of passages of Scripture appeared for the first time in his writings, and have ever since been warmly approved. In other cases, the views which had been previously held are placed by him in so strong a light as to remove every doubt, and satisfy the most cautious inquiry. And yet the stores, from which so much has been drawn, are far from being exhausted, nor is their value greatly lowered by improvements which have been subsequently made. The department of History presents an analogous case. Documents which had been overlooked are carefully examined. Conflicting evidence is more accurately weighed. Important transactions assume a new aspect, or, at least, are altered in their subordinate details. Still, there are historians, in whose narrative the great lines of truth are so powerfully drawn, that the feebler, though more exact, delineations of other men cannot supply their place. In the chief moral requisite for such a work Calvin is excelled by none. He is an honest interpreter. No consideration would have induced him to wrest the words of Scripture from their plain meaning. Those who may question his conclusions cannot trace them to an unworthy motive. Timid theologians will be occasionally startled by his expositions. Though they may not absolutely impeach the soundness of his doctrine, they will tremble for the fate of some favorite theory or ingenious argument. With such minds he has no sympathy. He examines the Scriptures with the humility of one who inquires at the oracle of God, (2 Samuel 16:23,) and proclaims the reply with the faith of one who knows that the word of the Lord is tried, (Psalm 18:30.)

The Devil Inside

Number 1 in series

The Devil Inside

POSSESSION. MURDER. MAYHEM. LET THE GAMES BEGIN... Morgan Kingsley, is an exorcist who precariously walks that fine line between heaven and hell. She lives in a world in which demons co-exist with humans. Normally hailed as heroes, these demons can heal, help, and make strong the willing hosts who gladly accept their corporeal possession... unless a demon steps outside the boundaries of the law. That's where Morgan, comes in. She is an expert in getting rogue demons to leave their unwilling hosts.But now the unthinkable has happened: Morgan's got a demon of her very own sharing - possibly overtaking - her body. But this sexy beast is so enticing that he may tempt Morgan to re-evaluate her prejudice against demons - if he doesn't get her killed first. For a war is brewing in the demon realm, and Morgan has just been forced to take sides...

The Angel Stones

The Angel Stones

As chaos begins happening around the world a group of unlikely characters have joined together to find the missing Angel stones spread all over. As the angels in heaven try to prevent things from getting even worse in the world for two of their own are missing.

The Churchills

A Family Portrait

The Churchills

Beautiful, rich, and powerful, the Churchills dominated world politics for generations—but like every family, they too have their secrets. Winston Churchill is arguably the most famous Briton, but a shroud of mystery still surrounds him and his family—Winston's mother, Jennie had a secret affair with the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, and her spendthrift habits devastated their reputation. The younger brother, Jack, has been largely forgotten, but played a crucial role both in Winston's successes, and in holding the family together during the tough times—all this in addition to the myths propagated by Winston's political enemies that persist to this day. From Sir Randolph's alleged syphilis to Winston's illegitimacy, and from Jennie's gambling problem to Jack's dashed ambitions, authors Celia and John Lee use never before seen archives to cut through the rumors and lies and get to the truth about the life of the former prime minister and his relationship with his family. Chock full of intrigue and scandal, The Churchills finally sets the record straight regarding one of the world's greatest dynasties.