From the Log of the Velsa

From the Log of the Velsa

"From the Log of the Velsa" by Arnold Bennett. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Arnold Bennett

A Biography

Arnold Bennett

'Arnold Bennett was born in a street called Hope Street. A street less hopeful it would be hard to imagine.' Thus begins Margaret Drabble's biography of a man whose most famous achievement was to re-create, in such novels as The Old Wives' Tale and Clayhanger, the life, atmosphere and character of the 'Five Towns' region in which he was born and grew up. Arnold Bennett is a very personal book. 'What interests me', writes the author, 'is Bennett's background, his childhood and origins, for they are very similar to my own. My mother's family came from the Potteries, and the Bennett novels seem to me to portray a way of life that still existed when I was a child, and indeed persists in certain areas. So like all books this has been partly an act of self-exploration.' Of Bennett as a writer Drabble says 'The best books I think are very fine indeed, on the highest level, deeply moving, original and dealing with material that I had never before encountered in fiction, but only in life: I feel they have been underrated, and my response to them is so constant, even after years of work on them and constant re-readings, that I want to communicate enthusiasm.' Of Bennett as a man she paints an affectionate portrait, not glossing over the irritability, dyspepsia and rigidity which at times made him so difficult a companion but reminding us too of his honesty, kindliness and sensitivity. 'Many a time,' she writes at the end of the book, 're-reading a novel, reading a letter or a piece of his Journal, I have wanted to shake his hand, or to thank him, to say well done. I have written this instead.'

The art of E. A. Rickards

comprising a collection of his architectural drawings, paintings, and sketches

The art of E. A. Rickards


The Dial

The Dial


The Bookman

The Bookman


The Sorcerer's Equal

The Sorcerer's Equal

Following a fierce battle, Grau's life hangs in the balance. Velsa seeks healing and refuge in the land of Laionesse, only to learn that Grau's injuries may be beyond help--unless Velsa and her friends can beg a favor from the great necromancer Dormongara, who lives alone in a castle on a mountain and is notoriously unkind to visitors. Indeed, the steep price he demands will have unexpected consequences, bringing an old nemesis back into Velsa's life along with a notorious gang of bandits. Velsa and Grau must consider how many times they will run from their fate and what tests true love can withstand in this conclusion to The Telepath and the Sorcerer trilogy.