First Confession

A Sort of Memoir

First Confession

Chris Patten was a cradle Catholic (hence First Confession), became on the most prominent Tory 'Wets' of the 1980s and 1990s, and went on to hold a series of prominent public offices - Chairman of the Conservative Party, the last Governor of Hong Kong, European Commissioner for External Affairs, Chancellor of Oxford University, Chairman of the BBC, advisor to the Pope - as he self-deprecatingly puts it 'a Grand Poo-bah, the Lord High Everything Else'. He writes with wry humour about his time in all these offices, taking us behind the scenes and showing us unexpected sides of many of the great figures of the day. No political writer is so purely enjoyable as Chris Patten.

First Confession

First Confession

Two wealthy nine-year-olds living in a Mexican village in 1947 steal the town hooker's life savings and flee to an impoverished section, where they are set upon and abused by the desperate children who live there

A Study Guide for Frank O'Connor's "First Confession"

A Study Guide for Frank O'Connor's

A Study Guide for Frank O'Connor's "First Confession," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Short Stories for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Short Stories for Students for all of your research needs.

Celebrating Your Child's First Reconciliation

Celebrating Your Child's First Reconciliation

Whether its been a few months or several years since parents have been to Confession, theyll find this refreshing resource helpful as they prepare children for First Reconciliation. Its filled with practical advice and detailed explanations of what happens before, during and after the sacrament. With an Imprimatur, and a collection of family prayers, its the perfect take-home resource for every parent in your sacramental program.

Confession

Catholics, Repentance, and Forgiveness in America

Confession

Confession is a history of penance as a virtue and a sacrament in the United States from about 1634, when Catholicism arrived in Maryland, to 2015, fifty years after the major theological and disciplinary changes initiated by the Second Vatican Council. Patrick W. Carey argues that the Catholic theology and practice of penance, so much opposed by the inheritors of the Protestant Reformation, kept alive the biblical penitential language in the United States at least until the mid-1960s when Catholic penitential discipline changed. During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American Catholics created institutions that emphasized, in opposition to Protestant culture, confession to a priest as the normal and almost exclusive means of obtaining forgiveness. Preaching, teaching, catechesis, and parish revival-type missions stressed sacramental confession and the practice became a widespread routine in American Catholic life. After the Second Vatican Council, the practice of sacramental confession declined suddenly. The post-Vatican II history of penance, influenced by the Council's reforms and by changing American moral and cultural values, reveals a major shift in penitential theology; moving from an emphasis on confession to emphasis on reconciliation. Catholics make up about a quarter of the American population, and thus changes in the practice of penance had an impact on the wider society. In the fifty years since the Council, penitential language has been overshadowed increasingly by the language of conflict and controversy. In today's social and political climate, Confession may help Americans understand how far their society has departed from the penitential language of the earlier American tradition, and consider the advantages and disadvantages of such a departure.

Reformed Confessions of the Sixteenth Century

Reformed Confessions of the Sixteenth Century

Reformed Confessions of the Sixteenth Centurymakes available a number of confessional documents that are not easily accessible elsewhere. Arthur Cochrane's introduction to the work and to each confession indicates each document's importance and its theological emphases. A new introduction by Jack Rogers focuses on developments in the study of Reformed Confessions since the first appearance of Cochrane's book in 1966.