Fire Shut Up in My Bones

Fire Shut Up in My Bones

A New York Times Notable Book | Lambda Literary Award Winner | Long-listed for the PEN Open Book Award “Charles Blow is the James Baldwin of our age.” — Washington Blade “[An] exquisite memoir . . . Delicately wrought and arresting.” — New York Times Universally praised on its publication, Fire Shut Up in My Bones is a pioneering journalist’s indelible coming-of-age tale. Charles M. Blow’s mother was a fiercely driven woman with five sons, brass knuckles in her glove box, and a job plucking poultry at a factory near their segregated Louisiana town, where slavery's legacy felt close. When her philandering husband finally pushed her over the edge, she fired a pistol at his fleeing back, missing every shot, thanks to “love that blurred her vision and bent the barrel.” Charles was the baby of the family, fiercely attached to his “do-right” mother. Until one day that divided his life into Before and After—the day an older cousin took advantage of the young boy. The story of how Charles escaped that world to become one of America’s most innovative and respected public figures is a stirring, redemptive journey that works its way into the deepest chambers of the heart. “Stunning . . . Blow’s words grab hold of you . . . [and] lead you to a place of healing.” — Essence “The memoir of the year.” — A. V. Club

Fire In My Bones: A Walk Through Jeremiah

Fire In My Bones: A Walk Through Jeremiah

“But if I say, ‘I will not mention him or speak anymore in his name,’ his word is in my heart like a fire shut up in my bones. I am weary of holding it in. Indeed, I cannot.” - J. 20:9 Heinrich Ewald called Jeremiah, “the most human prophet.” To Douglas Humphries, he’s always been Jerry, “the prophet who talked back.” Unexpectedly, blessedly standing in opposition to everything he thought it took to be one of the faithful. Jeremiah’s story is one of rejection and destruction, tragic and yet profoundly hopeful. A true picture of what it costs to do the hard, right thing. What it means to follow God. What it means to even know God. And it found Douglas exactly when he needed it to. Part biblical analysis, part memoir, part confessional. As much a reaction to scripture as it is an investigation of it. This book brings new insight into an old, but all too familiar story. A new way to consider an old, but dear prophet.