Everyday Transgressions

Domestic Workers' Transnational Challenge to International Labor Law

Everyday Transgressions

Adelle Blackett tells the story behind the International Labour Organization's (ILO) Decent Work for Domestic Workers Convention No. 189, and its accompanying Recommendation No. 201 which in 2011 created the first comprehensive international standards to extend fundamental protections and rights to the millions of domestic workers laboring in other peoples' homes throughout the world. As the principal legal architect, Blackett is able to take us behind the scenes to show us how Convention No. 189 transgresses the everyday law of the household workplace to embrace domestic workers' human rights claim to be both workers like any other, and workers like no other. In doing so, she discusses the importance of understanding historical forms of invisibility, recognizes the influence of the domestic workers themselves, and weaves in poignant experiences, infusing the discussion of laws and standards with intimate examples and sophisticated analyses. Looking to the future, she ponders how international institutions such as the ILO will address labor market informality alongside national and regional law reform. Regardless of what comes next, Everyday Transgressions establishes that domestic workers' victory is a victory for the ILO and for all those who struggle for an inclusive, transnational vision of labor law, rooted in social justice.

Renaissance Culture and the Everyday

Renaissance Culture and the Everyday

Items as familiar as mirrors, books, horses, money, laundry baskets, graffiti, embroidery, and food look decidedly less familiar when seen through the eyes of Renaissance men and women. In Renaissance Culture and the Everyday, such scholars as Judith Brown, Frances Dolan, Richard Helgerson, Debora Shuger, Don Wayne, and Stephanie Jed illuminate the sometimes surprising issues at stake in just such common matters of daily life during the Renaissance in England and on the Continent.

The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

With contributions from over 60 leading experts in the field, The Oxford Handbook of Criminology is the definitive guide to the discipline providing an authoritative and outstanding collection of chapters on the key topics studied on criminology courses. The Handbook has shaped the study of criminology for over two decades and, with this new edition, continues to be indispensable to students, academics, and professionals alike. Each chapter details relevant theory, recent research, policy developments, and current debates. Extensive references aid further research. Extensively revised, the sixth edition has been expanded to include all the major topics and significant new issues such as zemiology; green criminology; domestic violence; prostitution and sex work; penal populism; and the significance of globalization for criminology. The Oxford Handbook of Criminology is accompanied by a suite of online resources providing additional teaching and learning materials for both students and lecturers. This includes selected chapters from previous editions, essay questions for each chapter, web links to aid further research, and guidance on how to answer essay questions.

Postcolonial Piracy

Media Distribution and Cultural Production in the Global South

Postcolonial Piracy

Across the global South, new media technologies have brought about new forms of cultural production, distribution and reception. The spread of cassette recorders in the 1970s; the introduction of analogue and digital video formats in the 80s and 90s; the pervasive availability of recycled computer hardware; the global dissemination of the internet and mobile phones in the new millennium: all these have revolutionised the access of previously marginalised populations to the cultural flows of global modernity. Yet this access also engenders a pirate occupation of the modern: it ducks and deranges the globalised designs of property, capitalism and personhood set by the North. Positioning itself against Eurocentric critiques by corporate lobbies, libertarian readings or classical Marxist interventions, this volume offers a profound postcolonial revaluation of the social, epistemic and aesthetic workings of piracy. It projects how postcolonial piracy persistently negotiates different trajectories of property and self at the crossroads of the global and the local.

Just the Facts Ma'am

A Case Study of the Reversal of Corruption in the LAPD

Just the Facts Ma'am

Just the Facts Ma'am is the only book written from an economics perspective that addresses one of the most remarkable cases of the reversal of corruption in the history of the United States - a case of corruption in the Los Angeles Police Department.

Chiricahua and Janos

Communities of Violence in the Southwestern Borderlands, 1680-1880

Chiricahua and Janos

Borderlands violence, so explosive in our time, has deep roots in history. Lance R. Blyth’s study of Chiricahua Apaches and the presidio of Janos in the U.S.-Mexican borderlands reveals how no single entity had a monopoly on coercion, and how violence became the primary means by which relations were established, maintained, or altered both within and between communities, to include the Spanish-Mexican settlement of Janos in Nueva Vizcaya, present-day Chihuahua, and the Chiricahua Apaches. For more than two centuries violence was at the center of the relationships by which Janos and Chiricahua formed their communities. Violence created families by turning boys into men through campaigns and raids, which ultimately led to marriage and also determined the provisioning and security of these families, with acts of revenge and retaliation governing their attempts to secure themselves even as trade and exchange continued sporadically. This revisionist work reveals how during the Spanish, Mexican, and American eras both conflict and accommodation constituted these two communities that previous historians have often treated as separate and antagonistic. By showing not only the negative aspects of violence but also its potentially positive outcomes, Chiricahua and Janos helps us to understand violence not only in the southwestern borderlands but in borderland regions generally around the world.

Feeling Power

The Discourses of Emotion in United States Higher Education

Feeling Power


The African Diaspora

Africans and Their Descendants in the Wider World to 1800

The African Diaspora


Best American Crime Writing

Best American Crime Writing

The first volume in a new series of anthologies featuring the best crime journalism of the past year includes Mark Singer's study of cockfighting "The Chicken Warriors," David McClintick's Vanity Fair article on a vicious serial killer "Fatal Bondage," and E. Jean Carrol's "The Cheerleaders," about the effects of crime on an idyllic town. Simultaneous. 35,000 first printing.