Epicurus and Democritean Ethics

An Archaeology of Ataraxia

Epicurus and Democritean Ethics

Explores the origins of the Epicurean philosophical system in the fifth and fourth centuries BC.

The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism

The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism

An introduction to the history of the ancient philosophical school and an account of the areas of its philosophical interest.

Presocratics

Presocratics

The earliest phase of philosophy in Europe saw the beginnings of cosmology and rational theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethical and political theory. It saw the development of a wide range of radical and challenging ideas: from Thales' claim that magnets have souls and Parmenides' account that there is only one unchanging existent to the development of an atomist theory of the physical world. This general account of the Presocratics introduces the major Greek philosophical thinkers from the sixth to the middle of the fifth century BC. It explores how we might go about reconstructing their views and understanding the motivation and context for their work as well as highlighting the ongoing philosophical interest of their often surprising claims. Separate chapters are devoted to each of the major Presocratic thinkers, including Xenophanes, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Leucippus and Democritus, and an introductory chapter sets the scene by describing their intellectual world and the tradition through which their philosophy has been transmitted and interpreted. With a useful chronology and guide to further reading, the book is an ideal introduction for the student and general reader.

Nietzsche and Antiquity

His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition

Nietzsche and Antiquity

Wide-ranging essays making up the first major study of Nietzsche and the classical tradition in a quarter of a century.

Epicurus on the Self

Epicurus on the Self

Epicurus on the Self reconstructs a part of Epicurean ethics which only survives on the fragmentary papyrus rolls excavated from an ancient library in Herculaneum, On Nature XXV. The aim of this book is to contribute to a deeper understanding of Epicurus’ moral psychology, ethics and of its robust epistemological framework. The book also explores how the notion of the self emerges in Epicurus’ struggle to express the individual perspective of oneself in the process of one’s holistic self-reflection as an individual psychophysical being.

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XXX

Summer 2006

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy XXX

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy is a volume of original articles on all aspects of ancient philosophy. The articles may be of substantial length, and include critical notices of major books. OSAP is published twice yearly, in both hardback and paperback.

Epicurus and His Philosophy

Epicurus and His Philosophy

Epicurus and His Philosophy was first published in 1954. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. In this volume, the first comprehensive book in English about Epicurus, existing data on the life of the ancient philosopher is related to the development of his doctrine. The result is a fascinating account that challenges traditional theories and interpretations of Epicurean philosophy. Professor DeWitt demonstrates the fallacy of centuries of abuse of Epicurus and the resulting distortion of most discussions of Epicureanism that appear in standard philosophical works. Of major significance to students of philosophy and theology are the findings that show the importance of Epicureanism as a source of numerous Christian beliefs.

Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy

Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy

Offers a collection of essays exploring notions of authority and authorship through ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.