Desire for Development

Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative

Desire for Development

Heron draws on post-structuralist notions of subjectivity, critical race and space theory, feminism, colonial and postcolonial studies, and travel writing to trace colonial continuities in the post-development recollections of white Canadian women who have worked in Africa. Following the narrative arc of the development worker story from the decision to go overseas, through the experiences abroad, the return home, and final reflections, the book interweaves theory with the words of the participants. She posits that the desire for development is about the making of self in terms that are highly raced, classed, and gendered. The construction of white female subjectivity is thereby revealed as contingent on notions of goodness and Othering, played out against, and constituted by, the backdrop of the North-South binary, in which Canadas national narrative situates us as the 'good guys' of the world.

Desire Named Development

Desire Named Development

The predatory neo-liberal capitalism that has become the norm in India over the last two decades raises many uncomfortable questions. Today, consumption defines what we are. And with the western capitalist model reigning supreme, all of us seem to have been reduced to being just consumers in the eyes of the government. The effect on India’s peasantry has been tremendous. The recent tragic stories played out in Kalinganagar, Singur and Nandigram show how many farmers suddenly find themselves up against the might of the state. The ‘theft’ of agricultural land from poor farmers in the name of progress has become routine. Meanwhile, private corporations continue to ravage the country’s natural resources without any protest from the administration. In Desire Named Development, Aditya Nigam makes the case for dismantling some cherished beliefs and for restructuring the economy and our cities in particular ways. A substantial change in government policies and individual consumption habits can still make another world possible for India’s future. Does the economy exist for the sake of the consumer or does the consumer exist for the sake of the economy? Do we drive the automobile or does the automobile drive us? A provocative, elegantly argued book critiquing India's consumer-driven ecoomic policy

Intimate Economies of Development

Mobility, Sexuality and Health in Asia

Intimate Economies of Development

Aspirations, desires, opportunism and exploitation are seldom considered as fundamental elements of donor-driven development as it impacts on the lives of people in poor countries. Yet, alongside structural interventions, emotional or affective engagements are central to processes of social change and the making of selves for those caught up in development’s slipstream. Intimate Economies of Development lays bare the ways that culture, sexuality and health are inevitably and inseparably linked to material economies within trajectories of modernization in the Greater Mekong Sub-region. As migration expands and opportunities proliferate throughout Asia, different cultural groups increasingly interact as a result of targeted interventions and globalising economic formations; but they do so with different capabilities and expectations. This book uniquely grounds its arguments in interlocking details of people's everyday lives and aspirations in developing Asia, while also engaging with changing social values and moral frameworks. Part and parcel of a widening landscape of mobility and contingent intimacy is the ever-present threats of infectious disease, most prominently HIV/AIDS, and human trafficking. Thus, impact assessment and targeted interventions aim to address negative consequences that frequently accompany infrastructure development and market expansion. This path-breaking book, drawn on more than 20 years of ethnographic research in the Mekong region, shows how current models of mitigation cannot adequately cope with health risks generated by wide-ranging entrepreneurialism and enduring structural violence as dreams of ‘the good life’ are relentlessly enmeshed in strategies of livelihood improvement.

Development Theory

Development Theory

"This exciting book is a tour de force, spanning a broad range of approaches to development. It does not stop at critique, as so many previous books on these issues have done, but offers a unique perspective on future possibilities and the shape of things to come. It should be essential reading on all development studies courses". - Andrea Cornwall, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex Praise for the previous edition: "This marvellous book should be read by every social scientist interested in development studies". - Keith Griffin, University of California, Riverside This is the second edition of this successful book. Written by one of the leading authorities in the field, it: Situates students in the expanding field of development theory. Provides an unrivalled guide to the strengths and weaknesses of competing theoretical approaches. Explains key concepts. Examines the shifts in theory. Offers an agenda for the future. Jan Nederveen brings together a huge range of experience and knowledge about the relationship between the economically advanced and the emerging, developing nations.

Confronting Desire

Psychoanalysis and International Development

Confronting Desire

By applying psychoanalytic perspectives to key themes, concepts, and practices underlying the development enterprise, Confronting Desire offers a new way of analyzing the problems, challenges, and potentialities of international development. Ilan Kapoor makes a compelling case for examining development's unconscious desires, and in the process inaugurates a new field of study: psychoanalytic development studies. Drawing from the work of Jacques Lacan and Slavoj Žižek, as well as from psychoanalytic postcolonial and feminist scholarship, Kapoor analyzes how development's unconscious desires "speak out," most often in excessive and unpredictable ways that contradict the outwardly rational declarations of its practitioners. He investigates development's many irrationalities—from obsessions about growth and poverty to the perverse seductions of racism and over-consumption. By deploying key psychoanalytic concepts—enjoyment, fantasy, antagonism, fetishism, envy, drive, perversion, and hysteria—Confronting Desire critically analyzes important issues in development—growth, poverty, inequality, participation, consumption, corruption, gender, "race," LGBTQ politics, universality, and revolution. Confronting Desire offers prescriptions for applying psychoanalysis to development theory and practice and demonstrates how psychoanalysis can provide fertile ground for radical politics and the transformation of international development.

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition presents an authoritative and up-to-date overview of research and theory concerning a child's social development from pre-school age to the onset of adolescence. Presents the most up-to-date research and theories on childhood social development Features chapters by an international cast of leaders in their fields Includes comprehensive coverage of a range of disciplinary perspectives Offers all new chapters on children and the environment, cultural influences, history of childhood, interventions, and neuro-psychological perspectives Represents an essential resource for students and researchers of childhood social development

On the Edges of Development

Cultural Interventions

On the Edges of Development

Big business, financial institutions, and capitalist powers have wreaked much havoc on the Third World in the name of development. This book re-imagines development through a careful and imaginative exploration of some of the many ways that culture – in the broadest sense of lived experience and its representation – can recenter resistance, suggest alternative models, and advance critiques of development as it is currently practiced. The diverse group of scholars and activists who contribute chapters to the volume engage with the puzzle of how best to conceptualize an alternative development that improves the living conditions of women and men in different parts of the world and simultaneously demands solutions that focus on the integration of gender, diversity, and development with the realities of people’s lives.

The Political Economy of Desire

International Law, Development and the Nation State

The Political Economy of Desire

Containing the best interdisciplinary work in international law, this book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist ‘development’. Putting forth ground-breaking arguments and challenging the traditional boundaries of thinking about the concept of development and underdevelopment, it provides readers with a new perspective on the West's relationship with the rest of the world. With Jennifer Beard’s departure from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist era, The Political Economy of Desire positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the Western theological concepts of sin, salvation and redemption are expounded. Drawing upon legal theory, anthropology, economics, historiography, philosophy of science, theology, feminism, cultural studies and development studies the author explores: the link between the writings of early theologians and the processes of modern identity formation – tracing the concept of development to a particularly Christian dynamic how the promise of salvation continues to influence Western ontology. An innovative and topical work, this volume is an essential read for those interested in international law and socio-legal theory.

The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon

The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon

David Webster explores the notion of desire as found in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Beginning by addressing the idea of a 'paradox of desire', whereby we must desire to end desire, the varieties of desire that are articulated in the Pali texts are examined. A range of views of desire, as found in Western thought, are presented as well as Hindu and Jain approaches. An exploration of the concept of ditthi(view or opinion) is also provided, exploring the way in which 'holding views' can be seen as analogous to the process of desiring. Other subjects investigated include the mind-body relationship, the range of Pali terms for desire, and desire's positive spiritual value. A comparative exploration of the various approaches completes the work.