Desirable literacies

approaches to language and literacy in the early years

Desirable literacies

`The book demonstrates the importance of providing meaningful, purposeful opportunities for children to develop, explore and enjoy the full range of literacy experiences and offers plenty of practical ideas for how this can be achieved.... offers a very stimulating and even inspiring read to anyone involved in early years education' - Literacy and Language This book will help develop professional knowledge and expertise in the area of language and literacy in the early years. It relates current practices to relevant research and theory in a range of areas. It provides a framework for the planning and delivery of an early years language and literacy curriculum, with references to the Desirable Outcomes.

Picture Books for the Literacy Hour

Activities for Primary Teachers

Picture Books for the Literacy Hour

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Literacy and Power

Literacy and Power

Hilary Janks addresses key questions about literacy and power in this landmark text that is both engaging and accessible. Her central argument is that competing orientations to critical literacy education − domination (power), access, diversity, design − foreground one over the other, but are crucially interdependent and need to work together to create possibilities for redesign and social action that serve a social justice agenda. She examines the theory underpinning each orientation, and develops new theory in the argument for interdependence and integration. Sitting at the interface between theory and practice, constantly moving from one to the other, the text is rich with examples of how to use these orientations in real teaching contexts, and how to use them to counterbalance one another. In the groundbreaking final chapter Janks considers how the rationalist underpinning of critical literacy tends to exclude the non-rational shows ways of working ‘beyond reason’ − pleasure and play, desire and the unconscious − and makes the case that these need to be taken seriously given their power to cut across the work of critical literacy educators working from any orientation.

Teaching Geography 3-11

Teaching Geography 3-11

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Readings for Reflective Teaching in Early Education

Readings for Reflective Teaching in Early Education

Readings for Reflective Teaching in Early Education is a unique portable library of exceptional readings drawing together seminal extracts and contemporary literature from international sources from books and journals to support both initial study and extended career-long professionalism for early years practitioners. Introductions to each reading highlight the key issues explored and explain the status of classic works. This book, along with the core text and associated website, draw upon the work of Andrew Pollard, former Director of the TLRP, and the work of many years of accumulated understanding of generations of early years practitioners, primary school teachers and educationalists. Readings for Reflective Teaching in Early Education, the core text, Reflective Teaching in Early Education, and the website, provide a fully integrated set of resources promoting the expertise of early years professionals. The associated website, www.reflectiveteaching.co.uk offers supplementary resources including reflective activities, research briefings and advice on further readings. It also features a glossary of educational terms, links to useful websites and showcases examples of excellent research and practice. This book forms part of the Reflective Teaching series, edited by Andrew Pollard and Amy Pollard, offering support for reflective practice in early, primary, secondary, further, vocational, university and adult sectors of education.

Teaching History 3-11

Teaching History 3-11

These books provide a constructive, highly accessible and, above all, practical introduction to the teaching of Geography and History in early years and primary settings. In particular, they prepare initial teacher training students to meet government requirements for entry into the teaching profession. These are comprehensive guides to: o Geographical and historical knowledge and understandingo Planning, teaching and class managemento Monitoring, assessment, recording, reporting and accountabilityo General professional requirements>

Where's Spot?

Where's Spot?

A mother dog finds a variety of other animals hiding around the house before finding her lost puppy. Flaps conceal the animals.

Rethinking Biblical Literacy

Rethinking Biblical Literacy

What do people know about the Bible, and how much do they know? The media often discusses the worrying 'decline' in biblical literacy, but what does this really mean, and how can we measure this assumed 'decline'? How can we go about teaching 'biblical literacy', and about teaching teachers how to teach it? Rethinking Biblical Literacy explores the question of biblical literacy, examining the Bible's use, influence and impact in advertising, street art, poetry, popular erotic literature, Irish and UK secondary education, stand-up comedy and The Simpsons TV series to display the different types of literacy and knowledge of the Bible. Katie B. Edwards brings together several specialists in the cultural use, impact and influence of the Bible to examine the contested nature of biblical literacy and to explore the variety of ways of 'knowing' about the Bible. The picture created is one of a broad range and at times surprising depth of knowledge about what remains arguably the most influential collection of texts ever to be published.

Negotiating Critical Literacies in Classrooms

Negotiating Critical Literacies in Classrooms

Negotiating Critical Literacies in Classrooms brings together accounts of educators who have sought to make a difference in the lives of their students through literacy education--from university classrooms in the United States, England, and South Africa, to policy and curriculum development in Singapore and Australia. Each chapter represents the results of extended research on classroom practice. The authors in this collection write as teachers. The literacy classrooms they explore range from the early years of schooling, to primary and secondary education, through to community and university sites. Although the volume is organized around different levels of education, clearly overlapping themes emerge across the chapters, including identity formation and textual practices, politicizing curriculum and textbook production, and changing the power relations in classroom talk around text. An overarching theme of this collection is the belief that there is no one generic, universal critical literacy--in theory or in practice. Rather, the authors reveal how a range of theories can serve as productive starting points for educators working on social justice agendas through the literacy curriculum, and, equally important, how particular critical literacy theories or pedagogies must be worked out in specific locations. In each of these accounts, educators explain how they have taken a body of theory and worked with and on it in classrooms. Their rich portrayals and narratives of classroom realities illustrate the unanticipated effects of pedagogies that emerge in specific contexts. Experiences from the classrooms have led them to revise theories that are central to critical literacy, including constructs such as "empowerment," "resistance," and "multiple readings." This collection documents what occurs when educators confront the difficult ethical and political issues that evolve in particular classroom situations. Negotiating Critical Literacies in Classrooms is appropriate as a text for courses in language and literacy education, and will be of broad interest to educational researchers, practitioners, and theorists. The practical classroom focus makes this book accessible and of interest to a wide range of teachers and an excellent resource for professional development. The international scope will appeal to a global educational readership.

Assessing New Literacies

Perspectives from the Classroom

Assessing New Literacies

New literacies, globally popular among children and adolescents in and out of school contexts, are challenging educators and institutions to rethink pedagogies. As educators begin to embrace the pedagogical possibilities of multimodal texts and digital practices, they are exploring the complexities of assessing these new literacies. The essays in this book explore what it means to assess the sophisticated textual engagements of new literacies, including reading and writing online, social networking, gaming, multimodal composing, and creating virtual identities. Chapters offer practical examples of new literacies, and examine how assessment provides insight into the diverse ways in which language is conceived, valued, and used to inform the literate lives of its twenty-first century users. Scholars and educators will find this collection full of rich understanding of the assessment concerns raised by new communication practices, youth culture, digital engagements, and semiotic diversification.