Crazy from the Heat

Crazy from the Heat

'I WAS THERE WITH THESE TWO GIRLS ONCE; THEY WERE STRIPPERS. THEY SAID 'DAVE, WE'D LIKE YOU TO GO UPSTAIRS, THE TWO OF US, WITH YOU. ' SO I SAID, 'OKAY'. IT WAS ANGUS, AND IT WAS HOT AND SWEATY AND HUMID, AND WE COMMENCED TO DELIVER THE GROCERIES AT 138 BEATS PER MINUTE OR MORE. ONE OF THE GIRLS HAD $1500 IN SINGLES AND FIVES AND TENS, HER END-OF-THE-WEEK TIPS AND PAY AND EVERYTHING IN HER G-STRING. NOBODY NOTICED, YOU KNOW, WHEN THE G-STRING CAME UNDONE -- WELL, I NOTICED -- NOBODY NOTICED THE MONEY, LIKE, FLOATING AROUND. I WOKE UP AT SOME POINT AROUND DAWN, THE TWO OF THEM WERE ASLEEP, AND ALL THREE OF US WERE COVERED WITH MONEY, EVERY SQUARE INCH OF SKIN HAD A DOLLAR BILL PASTED TO IT -- THERE WAS NOTHING BUT. THE WHOLE BED WAS COVERED WITH BILLS. OUR BODIES WERE COVERED WITH BILLS. THERE WAS BILLS IN MY UNDERWEAR. TAKE A LITTLE PICTURE OF THAT. ' So begins perhaps the ultimate rock autobiography. Throughout the late-seventies and eighties Van Halen were the archetypal American rock group. Whats more they were also the highest paid band in the history of show business, taking a cool $1 million for a night's work at a festival in 1983 and making the Guiness Book of Records.

Where the Boys are

Cinemas of Masculinity and Youth

Where the Boys are

A provocative, contemporary anthology examining the construction of boys' identity in modern cinema.

Big Game Hunter's Guide to Colorado

Big Game Hunter's Guide to Colorado

Designed for both resident and out-of-state hunters, this comprehensive travel/hunting guidebook has information on hunting tactics and techniques, shot placement, habitat and habits, hunting on public and private lands, and caring for meat and trophies. Also includes essential travel information on restaurants, meat processors, gunsmiths, and more.

The Secret History of Rock 'n' Roll

The Secret History of Rock 'n' Roll

"...tells the story of the Mysteries [e.g. Mystery religions]--their rise, fall and eventual rebirth in the New World, where rhythms and melodies from the West African and the Celtic diasporas collided with the sound of popular music forever."--P. 4 of cover.

Heat Seeker

Heat Seeker

Morgan is an Echelon Officer in the Protector Corp, the sole law enforcement agency for all existence. He is summoned to the Earth citystate of Um-ka to investigate the murder of a prominent Scientist. He discovers that the murderer is a genetic superman who calls himself The Warrior. During their first skirmish, Morgan is surprised to find that there is another – a genetic superwoman named Snake. Morgan is befriended by Time Walker, a time traveler from Earth’s distant future, who takes him into the future to search for the great Scientist – Swoosa, who lives on the distant crystal planet Jen. Swoo-sa is the greatest scientist of a race of scientists and he creates a special virus that will weaken the Warrior and Snake. Morgan and Time Walker return to Um-ka and release the virus. The Warrior and Snake are captured. Romulus Dade Rhea, the despotic ruler of Um-ka, arrives and orders Morgan to execute Snake and The Warrior. Morgan refuses. The Warrior confesses that Romulus had the prominent Scientist killed to prevent him from revealing Romulus’ plot to scare the outer villages into staying part of the Um-ka union to maintain control of the newly discovered Qwe, the most powerful and valuable energy source in all of existence.

The Trail to Crazy Man

Stories

The Trail to Crazy Man

A WORD FROM LOUIS L’AMOUR “Almost forty years ago, when my fiction was being published exclusively in ‘pulp’ western magazines, I wrote several novel-length stories, which my editors called ‘magazine novels.’ In creating them, I became so involved with my characters that their lives were still as much a part of me as I was of them long after the issues in which they appeared became collector’s items. Pleased as I was about how I brought the characters and their adventures to life in the pages of the magazines, I still wanted the reader to know more about my people and why they did what they did. So, over the years, I revised and expanded these magazine works into fuller-length novels that I published in paperback under other titles. “These particular early magazine versions of my books have long been a source of great speculation and curiosity among many of my readers, so much so of late, that I’m now pleased to collect three of them in book form for the first time. “I hope you enjoy them.”

The Crazy Makers

How the Food Industry Is Destroying Our Brains and Harming Our Children

The Crazy Makers

An unprecedented and impeccably reported look at how American food manufacturers and their "products" may be endangering our minds. With obesity becoming one of the fastest-growing worldwide epidemics, and manufactured food fueling that trend, The Crazy Makers is timelier than ever. This updated edition includes a new chapter on autism, as well as revised material that illustrates just how much the industry has changed in a few short years. Based on extensive research, epidemiological evidence, and a formal study of schoolchildren's eating habits, The Crazy Makers identifies how the latest food products may be literally driving us crazy. Carol Simontacchi offers the reader nutritional primers and recipes to help counteract the problems facing us and our children every time we sit down to eat.

The Heat of the Night

The Heat of the Night

It's supposed to be all hands on deck…not on each other! To Claudia Davis, her Australian beach hotel is paradise. To her business partner, Luke Hargreaves, it's a burden he's desperate to shake off! Then a cyclone hits, and it's down to them both to rebuild the resort. But keeping their minds on the job proves impossible with all those scorching-hot nights alone together…. Agreeing to a fling seems risk-free—Luke's leaving for London soon, and surely their chemistry will have self-combusted by then? Except with time running out it's just getting hotter…like a fireball burning out of control…. Those Summer Nights In Crescent Cove find sun, sea and steamy nights….

Crazy Good

The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America

Crazy Good

A hundred years ago, the most famous athlete in America was a horse. But Dan Patch was more than a sports star; he was a cultural icon in the days before the automobile. Born crippled and unable to stand, he was nearly euthanized. For a while, he pulled the grocer's wagon in his hometown of Oxford, Indiana. But when he was entered in a race at the county fair, he won -- and he kept on winning. Harness racing was the top sport in America at the time, and Dan, a pacer, set the world record for the mile. He eventually lowered the mark by four seconds, an unheard-of achievement that would not be surpassed for decades. America loved Dan Patch, who, though kind and gentle, seemed to understand that he was a superstar: he acknowledged applause from the grandstands with a nod or two of his majestic head and stopped as if to pose when he saw a camera. He became the first celebrity sports endorser; his name appeared on breakfast cereals, washing machines, cigars, razors, and sleds. At a time when the highest-paid baseball player, Ty Cobb, was making $12,000 a year, Dan Patch was earning over a million dollars. But even then horse racing attracted hustlers, cheats, and touts. Drivers and owners bet heavily on races, which were often fixed; horses were drugged with whiskey or cocaine, or switched off with "ringers." Although Dan never lost a race, some of his races were rigged so that large sums of money could change hands. Dan's original owner was intimidated into selling him, and America's favorite horse spent the second half of his career touring the country in a plush private railroad car and putting on speed shows for crowds that sometimes exceeded 100,000 people. But the automobile cooled America's romance with the horse, and by the time he died in 1916, Dan was all but forgotten. His last owner, a Minnesota entrepreneur gone bankrupt, buried him in an unmarked grave. His achievements have faded, but throughout the years, a faithful few kept alive the legend of Dan Patch, and in Crazy Good, Charles Leerhsen travels through their world to bring back to life this fascinating story of triumph and treachery in small-town America and big-city racetracks.

Bringing the Heat

Bringing the Heat

“An ambitious, remarkably frank” chronicle of the Philadelphia Eagles’ bid for the NFL championship by the #1 New York Times–bestselling author (Kirkus Reviews). In 1992, the Philadelphia Eagles—a team assembled in the image of their iconoclastic, controversial former head coach, Buddy Ryan—were known for their ferocious defense led by Reggie White, Seth Joyner, and Andre Waters, and for the otherworldly talents of quarterback Randall Cunningham. Now was the time for the Eagles’ campaign for the championship. But as the season progressed, it disintegrated into an ugly flurry of greed, racism, violence, personal and professional feuds, one tragic death, and a very wild face-off in the stands between a player’s wife and mistress. By midseason, the sentiment of both fans and press was the same: “shut up and play.” Told through the personal stories of the teammates themselves, as well as the coaches, managers and owner, Bringing the Heat spares nothing—and no one—in “a phenomenal feat of reportage, perfect for football fans coast to coast” (H. G. Bissinger, author of Friday Night Lights). “Overflows with stories of pro football dreams, of bravery in the face of injury. Yet it also unflinchingly tells of the darker side of life in the NFL: uncontrollable egos, ruined families, marital infidelity.” —The New York Times Book Review “There are now four mandatory books on football: Dan Jenkins’s Semi-Tough; George Plimpton’s Paper Lion; H. G. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights, and the hilarious, incorrigible son of them all, Mark Bowden’s Bringing the Heat.” —Michael Bamberger, Sports Illustrated