Costumes for the Stage

A complete handbook for every kind of play

Costumes for the Stage

For anyone producing costumes on a small budget, whether for schools, colleges or amateur, semi-professional or professional groups, this basic introduction offers practical advice for every kind of play, together with drawings, diagrams and patterns from which to work. It includes sections onm Greek plays, medieval miracles and mysteries, Shakespeare, 17th-century, 18th-century, Victorian and Edwardian costume. each section covers the details of men's and women's clothes and accessories, as well as methods for adapting and simplifying the style of the period.

More Costumes for the Stage

More Costumes for the Stage

Here is another feast of ideas and practical information from the author of Costumes for the Stage for anyone who needs to dress a drama production on a tight budget or by the simplest means. Sheila Jackson's first book has been in constant demand for over a decade. Now, in addition to developing some of her earlier ideas in areas such as historical cosutme and fabrics, she covers exciting new ground with sections on animal and bird costumes, musical and dance, ethnic costume, headdresses and accessories, plus advice on design and how to manage a costume plan, a section especially for schools, and another dealing with costume for video. Over seventy-five pages of her own lively line drawings, diagrams and patterns illustrate the text throughout.

Designing Costume for Stage and Screen

Designing Costume for Stage and Screen

"She is the most wonderfully inventive and brilliantly talented designer" Dame Judi Dench on Clancy. Deirdre Clancy is one of the most experienced and accomplished costume designers in the business. In this book, she gives her inside knowledge of designing for stage and screen, which includes television, film, theatre and opera. She includes a brief illustrated history of costume design - from the Greeks to Lady Gaga - an invaluable guide for students and current designers. Part Two takes the reader through the design process: how you go about doing it, and the different strands of costume design - from contemporary clothes through to period costume, how to communicate with the audience, designing on paper and with Photoshop or on an iPad and how to share and communicate your ideas and well as mood boards and collages for inspiration. Part Three is about the world of costume design - what it involves and how to get into the field, who does what and the differences between working for stage and screen productions. Clancy advises on budgets and improvisation and covers all the practicalities and behind-the-scenes tips. Part Four looks at period costume from the Dark Ages up to the twentieth century, encompassing authenticity and feasibility. Finally, Part Five looks at individual case studies in depth, including opera and Shakespeare productions. Packed with great drawings and case studies, this is an essential book for any student or professional costume designer looking for additional inside advice. Whether you are a designer for the stage or screen, this book has something new for you with advice from one of the best in the business.

Designing for the Theatre

Designing for the Theatre

Now in its second edition, Designing for the Theatre has established itself as the authoritative introduction to the processes of design for the theatre. Covering the contribution which can be made by costume, sets, props and lighting to a stage production, the author explains the purpose and process involved in their design. Included in this second edition are new photographs and drawings illustrating some of the most exciting and diverse current trends in stage design.

The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745

A Calendar of Plays, Entertainments, and Afterpieces

The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745

"The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745 is a comprehensive documentary history and calendar of Dublin Ireland's theatres from 1720, the year of Joseph Ashbury's death, to 1745, when Thomas Sheridan assumed the management of the united Smock Alley/Aungier Street companies and ushered in the "Golden Age" of early Dublin theatre. During the eighteenth century, Dublin was second only to London in the number of theatres it supported and in the number and quality of productions. Winner of Lehigh University Press's eighteenth-century studies prize, this work details for the first time evidence of nearly 1,400 stage performances in eight competing theatres and theatrical booths and hundreds of performers, many previously unnoticed. Programs are listed in a detailed calendar, which is organized by theatrical season and provides a day-by-day account of the plays, afterpieces, dances, music, and songs that were performed, as well as the many other forms of entertainment that were staged at the public theatres, such as rope-dancing, animal acts, and equilibres." "The actors who performed and their named roles are listed, as well as the recipients of benefits, the titles of all songs, dances, and other entr'acte entertainments. Each entry also incorporates all available contemporary commentary about each performance, financial information, and supplies locations of rare texts." "In the analytical introduction to the calendar, the authors discuss the physical characteristics and locations of the theatres; their acoustics and capacities; the Dublin theatre season; composition, administration, and management of the companies of performers; management styles and techniques; actors' contractual arrangements, conditions, and salaries; ticket prices; benefit and command performances; the composition of the repertory; costumes, scenery, wardrobe, and machinery, and much else. Special attention is paid to areas that have been neglected by previous histories, such as dance and dancers, and prologues and epilogues." "In addition to a general index, The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745 provides indexes of all mainpieces and afterpieces performed during the period in Dublin, cross-referenced with the venue and date of performance; an author/play index; and an alphabetical listing of all personnel associated with the Dublin stage at this time, as well as a selected bibliography." "Incorporating into their book the work of recent eighteenth-century theatre scholarship, the authors bring to light much that is new about a fascinating period of theatre history and greatly expand our knowledge about the plays and entertainments enjoyed by Dublin audiences, and about the identities of the stage personnel active in Dublin."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Design by Motley

Design by Motley

Beginning with designs for John Gielgud's production of Romeo and Juliet in 1932, Elizabeth Montgomery, Margaret Harris, and Sophia Harris designed more than three hundred productions under the name "Motley" (after Jaques' quip "Motley's the only wear"). Over the course of nearly four decades, they designed sets and costumes across the dramatic spectrum - straight plays, Shakespeare and other classics, ballet, opera, musicals, and films in both England and the United States. Design by Motley traces Motley's artistic accomplishments from the beginnings to the present. It draws upon original research in theatre archives and interviews with theatre artists. The volume is lavishly illustrated with original set and costume designs from the Motley Collection at the University of Illinois. Among Motley's accomplishments were designs for Gielgud's prodigious output during the 1930s in London, notably his Richard of Bordeaux, The Three Sisters, and The Importance of Being Earnest. On Broadway, their hits included South Pacific, A Man for All Seasons, and Anne of a Thousand Days. During the 1950s their designs graced Shakespeare productions at both Stratford-upon-Avon and Stratford, Connecticut. Motley operas included Il Trovatore at the New York Metropolitan Opera and War and Peace at the English National Opera, where they were resident designers during the 1960s and 1970s. At the London Theatre Studio before World War II, at the Old Vic School in the early 1950s, and at the Motley Theatre Design Course in London since 1966, they have trained hundreds of young designers from all over the world. The "New Stagecraft," which Motley helped to shape, replaced the painted, three-dimensional sets and realistic costumes of the nineteenth-century stage with fluid, representational scenery and evocative costumes. Together, the elements of the design formed a unified interpretation of the play. Motley's accomplishments were especially significant because they spanned both New York and London and set a standard for beauty and excellence in theatre design that lives on today in the work of their many students.

Stage Management

A Gentle Art

Stage Management

This popular book describes in detail a stage manager's job. It provides those just starting out in the profession with a solid grounding in theatre stage management practices and procedures. The disciplines of lighting, set design and sound are discussed but the main focus is the management of these elements and the processes and scheduling that go together to provide effective results. Chronologically following the production of a play, the book starts with pre-production planning and progresses to opening night. With easy reference checklists and a full glossary, it is the essential guide to stage management.

World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre

Volume 6: Bibliography and Cumulative Index

World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre

An annotated world theatre bibliography documenting significant theatre materials published world wide since 1945, plus an index to key names throughout the six volumes of the series.

Costume in Greek Classic Drama

Costume in Greek Classic Drama

This work describes how performers were dressed in plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and explains how the actors' performances influenced the cut of their costumes. 53 black-and-white illustrations.