Conducting Research in Conservation

Social Science Methods and Practice

Conducting Research in Conservation

This is the first textbook on social science research methods for use in the expanding and increasingly multidisciplinary field of environmental conservation. It is divided into five useful sections and illustrated throughout with practical examples of conservation-related research from different parts of the world (Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia) and different ecosystems (forests, grasslands, desert, marine and riverine systems, as well as farmland and home gardens). It will be an invaluable tool in the training of the next generation of conservation professionals.

Population Viability in Plants

Conservation, Management, and Modeling of Rare Plants

Population Viability in Plants

Persistence, threats, pathogens, herbivores, interactions, fragmented, landscape, extinction, habitat, disturbance, restoration.

Trade-offs in Conservation

Deciding What to Save

Trade-offs in Conservation

This book demonstrates that trade-offs can be very important for conservationists. Its various chapters show how and why trade-offs are made, and why conservationists need to think very hard about what, if anything, to do about them. The book argues that conservationists must carefully weigh up, and be explicit about, the trade-offs that they make every day in deciding what to save. Key Features: Discusses the wider non-biological issues that surround making decisions about which species and biogeographic areas to prioritise for conservation Focuses on questions such as: What are these wider issues that are influencing the decisions we make? What factors need to be included in our assessment of trade-offs? What package of information and issues do managers need to consider in making a rational decision? Who should make such decisions? Part of the Conservation Science and Practice book series This volume is of interest to policy-makers, researchers, practitioners and postgraduate students who are concerned about making decisions that include recognition of trade-offs in conservation planning.

Timber, Tourists, and Temples

Conservation And Development In The Maya Forest Of Belize Guatemala And Mexico

Timber, Tourists, and Temples

Timber, Tourists, and Temples brings together the leading biologists, social scientists, and conservationists working in the Maya Forest to present in a single volume information on the intricate social and political issues and complex scientific and management problems to be resolved there. It explores methods of supporting the biological foundation of the region and keeping alive its unique and diverse ecosystem. The wealth of information included in this pathbreaking work will be valuable not only for researchers involved with the Maya Forest but for anyone concerned with the protection, use, and management of tropical forest ecosystems throughout the world.

Soil and Water Conservation Research in the Pacific Coast Region

Soil and Water Conservation Research in the Pacific Coast Region

An effective soil and water conservation program must be based on sound technical information. Research has provided this pool of knowledge. Practices now being applied reflect the results gleaned from many years experience. This publication describes a few examples of recent soil and water conservation research.

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

In North America, concepts of Historical Range of Variability are being employed in land-management planning for properties of private organizations and multiple government agencies. The National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, and The Nature Conservancy all include elements of historical ecology in their planning processes. Similar approaches are part of land management and conservation in Europe and Australia. Each of these user groups must struggle with the added complication of rapid climate change, rapid land-use change, and technical issues in order to employ historical ecology effectively. Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management explores the utility of historical ecology in a management and conservation context and the development of concepts related to understanding future ranges of variability. It provides guidance and insights to all those entrusted with managing and conserving natural resources: land-use planners, ecologists, fire scientists, natural resource policy makers, conservation biologists, refuge and preserve managers, and field practitioners. The book will be particularly timely as science-based management is once again emphasized in United States federal land management and as an understanding of the potential effects of climate change becomes more widespread among resource managers. Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com/go/wiens/historicalenvironmentalvariation.