Comparing Financial Systems

Comparing Financial Systems

Why do different countries have such different financial systems? Is one system better than the other? This text argues that the view that market-based systems are best is simplistic, and suggests that a more nuanced approach is necessary.

Globalization and National Financial Systems

Globalization and National Financial Systems

This book breaks new ground by exploring the challenges, constraints, and opportunities of national financial systems in developing countries, while noting that all such systems must be considered small when viewed in the context of global finance. Banking, securities, contractual savings, and systemic macroeconomic aspects are all considered.

The Indian Financial System: Markets, Institutions And Services, 2/E

The Indian Financial System: Markets, Institutions And Services, 2/E

In fifteen years of reforms, the Indian financial system has metamorphosed into a substantive, competitive, market-oriented, modern and cost-effective twenty-first century system. This new edition, though fully revised and updated, preserves the strengths of the first edition while meeting the academic needs and aspiration of today's students and academicians. It has fuller treatment of the topics and, consequently, the size of the chapters has been enlarged to facilitate better understanding. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, boxes that discuss important concepts explored in detail, supp Paperbackortive up-to-date data, key terms, review exercises and chapter summary.

Modern Financial Systems

Theory and Applications

Modern Financial Systems

A valuable guide to the essential elements of modern financial systems This book offers you a unified theory of modern financial system activity. In it, author Edwin Neave distills a large body of literature on financial systems, the institutions that comprise the systems, and the economic impacts of the systems' operation. Through non-technical summaries, Neave provides you with a primer on how financial systems work, as well as how the many parts of any financial system relate to each other. He does so in a straightforward manner, with an emphasis on economic principles and the relationship between various aspects of financial system activity. Discusses financial governance and explains how financial markets and institutions complement each other Identifies the economic forces at work within financial systems and explores how they determine system organization and change Offers a theoretical survey of financial activity and its application to numerous practical situations Explains both static financial system organization and the dynamics of financial system evolution Following a non-technical approach, this book skillfully explores how financial systems work, as well as how the many parts of any financial system relate to each other.

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis

It is increasingly accepted that 'institutions matter' for economic organization and outcomes. The last decade has seen significant expansion in research examining how institutional contexts affect the nature and behaviour of firms, the operation of markets, and economic outcomes. Yet 'institutions' conceal a multitude of issues and perspectives. Much of this research has been comparative, and followed different models such as 'varieties of capitalism', 'national business systems', and 'social systems of production'. This Handbook explores these issues, perspectives, and models, with the leading scholars in the area contributing chapters to provide a central reference point for academics, scholars, and students.

Banks As Coordinators of Economic Growth

Banks As Coordinators of Economic Growth

This paper formally identifies an important role of banks: Banks competitively internalize production externalities and facilitate economic growth. I formulate a canonical growth model with externalities as a game among consumers, firms, and banks. Banks compete for deposits to seek monopoly profits, including externalities. Using loan contracts that specify price and quantity, banks control firms'' investments. Each bank forms a firm group endogenously and internalizes externalities directly within a firm group and indirectly across firm groups. This unique equilibrium requires a condition that separates competition for sources and uses of funds. I present a realistic institution that satisfies this condition.

Financing Africa

Through the Crisis and Beyond

Financing Africa

Financing Africa takes stock of Africa's financial systems in light of recent changes in the global financial system --including the greater risk aversion of international investors, a shift in economic and financial powers towards emerging markets and the regulatory reform debate - and the increasing role of technology. Using a wider and more detailed array of data than previous publications, we observe a trend towards financial deepening, more stability and more inclusion leading up to the crisis; serious challenges, however, continue, including limited access to financial services, focus on short-term contracts and hidden fragility, related to weak regulatory frameworks, undue government interference and governance deficiencies. Our policy analysis therefore focuses on (i) expanding outreach, (ii) fostering long-term finance and (iii) improving regulation and supervision. We identify the positive role of innovation and competition, a stronger focus on non-traditional financial service providers, and more emphasis on demand-side constraints as priority areas for policy actions. Specifically, competition from new players outside the banking system, including telecomm companies can increase outreach with technological innovation that changes the economics of retail finance. Moving beyond national stock exchanges that are not sustainable in most African countries towards regional solutions and over-the-counter trades can help foster long-term finance, as can addressing governance challenges in contractual savings institutions, including life insurance companies and pension funds. Finally, there is a need to look beyond supply-side constraints towards users of financial services, focusing more on financial literacy of households and firms, but also consumer protection. In formulating policy messages, we carefully distinguish between different country groupings, differentiating -- among others -- between low- and middle-income and small and larger economies, with a special focus on resource-based economies and post-conflict countries. This book reaches out to both policy makers concerned about a more inclusive and effective financial system and other stakeholders, including practitioners and development partners. With this book we aim to contribute to the on-going financial sector debate on Africa, with the ultimate goal of faster economic development and poverty reduction.

The Power of Inaction

Bank Bailouts in Comparison

The Power of Inaction

Bank bailouts in the aftermath of the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the onset of the Great Recession brought into sharp relief the power that the global financial sector holds over national politics, and provoked widespread public outrage. In The Power of Inaction, Cornelia Woll details the varying relationships between financial institutions and national governments by comparing national bank rescue schemes in the United States and Europe. Woll starts with a broad overview of bank bailouts in more than twenty countries. Using extensive interviews conducted with bankers, lawmakers, and other key players, she then examines three pairs of countries where similar outcomes might be expected: the United States and United Kingdom, France and Germany, Ireland and Denmark. She finds, however, substantial variation within these pairs. In some cases the financial sector is intimately involved in the design of bailout packages; elsewhere it chooses to remain at arm’s length. Such differences are often ascribed to one of two conditions: either the state is strong and can impose terms, or the state is weak and corrupted by industry lobbying. Woll presents a third option, where the inaction of the financial sector critically shapes the design of bailout packages in favor of the industry. She demonstrates that financial institutions were most powerful in those settings where they could avoid a joint response and force national policymakers to deal with banks on a piecemeal basis. The power to remain collectively inactive, she argues, has had important consequences for bailout arrangements and ultimately affected how the public and private sectors have shared the cost burden of these massive policy decisions.

Financial Crisis and Institutional Change in East Asia

Financial Crisis and Institutional Change in East Asia

In light of the Asian financial crisis of 1997, Lai examines whether East Asian economies converged onto the liberal market model by studying the evolution of the financial sectors of Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. This includes sectoral diversification, the nature of competition, and the regulatory and supervisory frameworks.