On Collective Intelligence

On Collective Intelligence

Welcome to the proceedings of the inaugural Symposium on Collective Intelligence (COLLIN 2010). This was the first of a new series of events that will evolve over the coming years, and we were happy to hold the event in Hagen where the idea for this symposium was born. The participants visited Hagen in April, with excellent opportunities to get rain, wind and sun. Collective intelligence denotes a phenomenon according to which the purposeful interaction between individuals creates intelligent solutions and behaviors that might not have come to existence without this concerted effort of a community. The members of such communities form a social network, typically over the Internet. They are engage with each other over a sustained period of time to develop an area of innovation through collaboration and exchange of ideas, experiences and information. Leading-edge information and communication technologies (ICT) offer ample opportunities for enabling collective intelligence. COLLIN aims to become the flagship conference in the areas collective intelligence and ICT-enabled social networking, which is attracting more and more researchers and practitioners from both academia and industry.

Computational Collective Intelligence. Semantic Web, Social Networks and Multiagent Systems

First International Conference, ICCCI 2009, Wroclaw, Poland, October 5-7, 2009, Proceedings

Computational Collective Intelligence. Semantic Web, Social Networks and Multiagent Systems

Computational collective intelligence (CCI) is most often understood as a subfield of artificial intelligence (AI) dealing with soft computing methods that enable group decisions to be made or knowledge to be processed among autonomous units acting in distributed environments. The needs for CCI techniques and tools have grown signi- cantly recently as many information systems work in distributed environments and use distributed resources. Web-based systems, social networks and multi-agent systems very often need these tools for working out consistent knowledge states, resolving conflicts and making decisions. Therefore, CCI is of great importance for today’s and future distributed systems. Methodological, theoretical and practical aspects of computational collective int- ligence, such as group decision making, collective action coordination, and knowledge integration, are considered as the form of intelligence that emerges from the collabo- tion and competition of many individuals (artificial and/or natural). The application of multiple computational intelligence technologies such as fuzzy systems, evolutionary computation, neural systems, consensus theory, etc. , can support human and other collective intelligence and create new forms of CCI in natural and/or artificial s- tems.

The United Nations and the Rationale for Collective Intelligence

The United Nations and the Rationale for Collective Intelligence

Taking as its central argument the question of whether an intelligence system is both desirable and feasible within the UN structure, this study explores the complex and sometimes, irreconcilable issues of strategic intelligence in a sharing context. This study further identifies and develops both conceptual and empirical framework for a viable intelligence capability in multi-agency institutions; exploring and suggesting, for the first time, necessary and acceptable conditions for collective intelligence in an environment characterised by conflicting objectives among international actors. It takes as its main premise the view that the United Nations and the world of intelligence are two separate and contradicting entities that conflict in both principles and operating doctrines. From this point of view, the author explores the many theoretical imperatives which set the two institutions apart and stand in the way of understanding the concepts. He also goes further to examine the contexts in which the contradictions could be harmonised. This book is one of a handful of studies; it is highly original in that it focuses on the relationship between intelligence and the United Nations. While previous efforts to examine the subject have approached it from a strictly practical point of view, this work is clearly focused on the linkages between theory and practice. The methodology is thoughtful and broad in scope, and the work is theoretically well informed and sophisticated in its analysis of the subject matter. The discussion of aspects of the theory of international relations--specifically those relevant to the role of international governance and the examination of the working of the UN--and several case studies of the UN in action are further characteristics of the rigor and clarity in which the author approaches the study in an intelligent and illuminating manner. While the book's many contributions can be found at various levels of originality, its thorough assessment of the linkage between theory and policy stands out, perhaps, as the most important and primary contribution to the areas of collective intelligence and international relations. Other important contributions include the case study analyses and specification of criteria for evaluating collective security intelligence mechanisms. In essence, a lack of scholarly efforts to ground the notion of collective intelligence within a rigorous intellectual framework is a significant vacuum in the study of intelligence which the present study has filled. Scholars working within the international relations discipline and more specifically issues of global governance and security will find this study invaluable. The book should also appeal to many categories of readers working in information and policy environment, as well as governmental and non-governmental organisations.

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence II

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence II

These Transactions publish research in computer-based methods of computational collective intelligence (CCI) and their applications in a wide range of fields such as the Semantic Web, social networks and multi-agent systems. TCCI strives to cover new methodological, theoretical and practical aspects of CCI understood as the form of intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals (artificial and/or natural). The application of multiple computational intelligence technologies such as fuzzy systems, evolutionary computation, neural systems, consensus theory, etc., aims to support human and other collective intelligence and to create new forms of CCI in natural and/or artificial systems. This second TCCI issue contains a collection of 10 articles selected from high-quality submissions addressing advances in the foundations and applications of computational collective intelligence.

Programming Collective Intelligence

Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications

Programming Collective Intelligence

Want to tap the power behind search rankings, product recommendations, social bookmarking, and online matchmaking? This fascinating book demonstrates how you can build Web 2.0 applications to mine the enormous amount of data created by people on the Internet. With the sophisticated algorithms in this book, you can write smart programs to access interesting datasets from other web sites, collect data from users of your own applications, and analyze and understand the data once you've found it. Programming Collective Intelligence takes you into the world of machine learning and statistics, and explains how to draw conclusions about user experience, marketing, personal tastes, and human behavior in general -- all from information that you and others collect every day. Each algorithm is described clearly and concisely with code that can immediately be used on your web site, blog, Wiki, or specialized application. This book explains: Collaborative filtering techniques that enable online retailers to recommend products or media Methods of clustering to detect groups of similar items in a large dataset Search engine features -- crawlers, indexers, query engines, and the PageRank algorithm Optimization algorithms that search millions of possible solutions to a problem and choose the best one Bayesian filtering, used in spam filters for classifying documents based on word types and other features Using decision trees not only to make predictions, but to model the way decisions are made Predicting numerical values rather than classifications to build price models Support vector machines to match people in online dating sites Non-negative matrix factorization to find the independent features in a dataset Evolving intelligence for problem solving -- how a computer develops its skill by improving its own code the more it plays a game Each chapter includes exercises for extending the algorithms to make them more powerful. Go beyond simple database-backed applications and put the wealth of Internet data to work for you. "Bravo! I cannot think of a better way for a developer to first learn these algorithms and methods, nor can I think of a better way for me (an old AI dog) to reinvigorate my knowledge of the details." -- Dan Russell, Google "Toby's book does a great job of breaking down the complex subject matter of machine-learning algorithms into practical, easy-to-understand examples that can be directly applied to analysis of social interaction across the Web today. If I had this book two years ago, it would have saved precious time going down some fruitless paths." -- Tim Wolters, CTO, Collective Intellect

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence I

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence I

These Transactions publish research in computer-based methods of computational collective intelligence (CCI) and their applications in a wide range of fields such as the Semantic Web, social networks and multi-agent systems. TCCI strives to cover new methodological, theoretical and practical aspects of CCI understood as the form of intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals (artificial and/or natural). The application of multiple computational intelligence technologies such as fuzzy systems, evolutionary computation, neural systems, consensus theory, etc., aims to support human and other collective intelligence and to create new forms of CCI in natural and/or artificial systems. This is the first volume of TCCI. It contains a collection of articles selected from regular submissions and invited papers of substantially extended contributions based on the best papers presented at the First International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence: Semantic Web, Social Networks and Multiagent Systems (ICCCI 2009) during October 5-7 , 2009 in Wroclaw (Poland). The 10 papers in this volume introduce advances in the foundations and applications of computational collective intelligence.

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence III

Transactions on Computational Collective Intelligence III

These Transactions publish research in computer-based methods of computational collective intelligence (CCI) and their applications in a wide range of fields such as the Semantic Web, social networks and multi-agent systems. TCCI strives to cover new methodological, theoretical and practical aspects of CCI understood as the form of intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals (artificial and/or natural). The application of multiple computational intelligence technologies such as fuzzy systems, evolutionary computation, neural systems, consensus theory, etc., aims to support human and other collective intelligence and to create new forms of CCI in natural and/or artificial systems. This third issue contains a collection of 10 articles selected from high-quality submissions addressing advances in the foundations and applications of computational collective intelligence.

Computational Collective Intelligence

9th International Conference, ICCCI 2017, Nicosia, Cyprus, September 27-29, 2017, Proceedings

Computational Collective Intelligence

This two-volume set (LNAI 10448 and LNAI 10449) constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Collective Intelligence, ICCCI 2017, held in Nicosia, Cyprus, in September 2017. The 117 full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 248 submissions. The conference focuseson the methodology and applications of computational collective intelligence, included: multi-agent systems, knowledge engineering and semantic web, social networks and recommender systems, text processing and information retrieval, data mining methods and applications, sensor networks and internet of things, decision support & control systems, and computer vision techniques.

Advanced Methods for Computational Collective Intelligence

Advanced Methods for Computational Collective Intelligence

The book consists of 35 extended chapters which have been selected and invited from the submissions to the 4th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence Technologies and Applications (ICCCI 2012) held on November 28-30, 2012 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The book is organized into six parts, which are semantic web and ontologies, social networks and e-learning, agent and multiagent systems, data mining methods and applications, soft computing, and optimization and control, respectively. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and practical issues connected with computational collective intelligence and related technologies. The editors hope that the book can be useful for graduate and Ph.D. students in Computer Science, in particular participants in courses on Soft Computing, Multiagent Systems, and Data Mining. This book can be also useful for researchers working on the concept of computational collective intelligence in artificial populations. It is the hope of the editors that readers of this volume can find many inspiring ideas and use them to create new cases of intelligent collectives. Many such challenges are suggested by particular approaches and models presented in individual chapters of this book. The editors hope that readers of this volume can find many inspiring ideas and influential practical examples and use them in their future work.

Advances in Collective Intelligence 2011

Advances in Collective Intelligence 2011

Collective intelligence has become an attractive subject of interest for both academia and industry. More and more conferences and workshops discuss the impact of the users‘ motivation to participate in the value creation process, the enabling role of leading-edge information and communication technologies and the need for better algorithms to deal with the growing amount of shared data. There are many interesting and challenging topics that need to be researched and discussed with respect to knowledge creation, creativity and innovation processes carried forward in the emerging communities of practice. COLLIN is on the path to become the flagship conference in the areas of collective intelligence and ICT-enabled social networking. We were delighted to again receive contributions from different parts of the world including Australia, Europe, Asia, and the United States. Encouraged by the positive response, we plan COLLIN 2012 to be held next year end of August at FernUniverstität in Hagen. In order to guarantee the quality of the event, each paper went through a doubleblind review process. The reviews concentrated on originality, quality and relevance of the paper topic to the symposium. In addition, we invited a few renowned experts in the field to contribute to the success of the symposium with outstanding papers reporting on their most recent research. Our special thanks go to the authors for submitting their papers, to the international program committee members, and to numerous reviewers who did an excellent job in guaranteeing that the papers in this volume are of very high quality.