CoHousing Inclusive

CoHousing Inclusive

Experimental dwelling forms-CoHousing Cultures-are entering the mainstream. But to what extent are they accessible and affordable for all, including people with more or less money, with or without refugee experience, with or without disabilities? Community- led housing initiatives are already developing diverse, sustainable neighborhoods, driven by civil society and increasingly supported by foundations, cooperatives and municipalities as well as housing companies and developers. This book contains critical reviews of model projects representing a multifaceted European movement, complemented with photos and drawings. Short texts argue how political and financial conditions can be improved to better realize community housing. Finally, a range of voices offer unconventional and promising strategies.

A History of Collective Living

Models of Shared Living

A History of Collective Living

The book tells the story of communal living from about 1850 until today. Three motives of sharing - the economic, political and social intention - divide the residential objects, which are investigated in a historical analysis and allocated to nine development phases. The author investigates and compares different forms of housing and the way they developed from their origins until today; she illustrates how everyday shared living and the degrees of privacy in housing are practiced in Europe. Owing to its comprehensive documentation, the analysis of typologies, layout plans, and user and expert interviews, the book can also be considered to be a lexicon or handbook on communal living. A detailed overview that is unique in this form.

Inclusive housing in an ageing society

Innovative approaches

Inclusive housing in an ageing society

The housing problems of older people in our society are highly topical because of the growing number of retired people in the population and, especially, the yet-to-come increasing number of 'very old' people. Government policies on the care of older people have been forthcoming from Whitehall, but the issue of housing is just beginning to be seriously addressed. This book represents a first attempt at bringing together people from the worlds of architecture, social science and housing studies to look at the future of living environments for an ageing society. Projecting thinking into the future, it asks critical questions and attempts to provide some of the answers. It uniquely moves beyond the issues of accommodation and care to look at the wider picture of how housing can reflect the social inclusion of people as they age. Inclusive housing in an ageing society will appeal to a wide audience - housing, health and social care workers including: housing officers, architects, planners and designers, community regeneration workers, care managers, social workers and social care assistants, registered managers and housing providers, health improvement staff and, of course, current and future generations of older people.

The re-emergence of co-housing in Europe

The re-emergence of co-housing in Europe

Across Europe, the number of co-housing initiatives is growing, and they are increasingly receiving attention from administrators and professionals who hold high expectations for urban liveability. Is co-housing a marginal idealist phenomenon, or the urban middle class’ answer to the current housing crisis? And has the development of theoretical insight and research kept up with the actual expansion of co-housing as a practice? These questions were raised during the first European conference on co-housing research, which took place in Tours, France, in March 2012. Both the conference and this book aim to move beyond case-studies, and to look more particularly at the implications and wider perspective of the current co-housing trend. Using the specific vocabulary of different disciplines and geographic regions, the contributions to this book analyse the underlying thinking behind, and the expectations projected on, diverse models of collaborative housing. The authors are aware of the qualities of contemporary co-housing, but they go beyond advocacy to investigate the conditions under which co-housing can be successful as a strategy for housing provision; can offer solutions for sustainable urban development; or indeed can contribute to involuntary or intentional gentrification. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Urban Research and Practice.

Creating Cohousing

Building Sustainable Communities

Creating Cohousing

The cohousing ?bible” by the US originators of the concept.

Toward Equity and Inclusion in Canadian Cities

Lessons from Critical Praxis-Oriented Research

Toward Equity and Inclusion in Canadian Cities

Housing insecurity, intensified employment anxiety, access to adequate services, and fear of personal and structural violence are some of the issues troubling today’s cities and municipalities. Often, these conditions most affect residents whose place in the social hierarchy makes them particularly susceptible to exclusion. Seeking to redress these trends and guide research to facilitate meaningful local action, Toward Equity and Inclusion in Canadian Cities promotes more inclusive urban environments by highlighting and comparing theoretical and practice-based insights. Building on feminist, anti-racist, and anti-colonialist arguments to offer action-oriented solutions to inequalities and exclusions, the contributors to this volume tackle themes such as LGBTQ inclusion, health disparities, diversity initiatives, and urban planning dilemmas. Through a lens of critical praxis the book explores the challenges of collaborations, the negotiations required to reconceptualize research relations, and the ways in which values and practices inform one another. In light of the growing complexity, interrelations, and interactions of our world, Toward Equity and Inclusion in Canadian Cities is a timely work that speaks to a diverse audience of activists, policy makers, community organizations, and researchers of various disciplines.

Sustainable Development and Planning II

Sustainable Development and Planning II

In recent years many countries have experienced an increase in spatial problems that has led to planning crises. The use of modern planning technologies, such as geographical information systems and remote sensing, gives us new potential to monitor and prevent environmental degradation. Effective strategies for management should consider sustainable development and planning and emphasise the need to handle these matters in an integrated way. These volumes contain the contributions presented at the Second International Conference on Sustainable Development and Planning which deal with the following topics: City planning; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental legislation and policy; Environmental management; Waste management; Resources management; Geo-informatics; Transportation; Ecosystems analysis, protection and remediation; Regional planning; Rural development; A Multidisciplinary approach to territorial

Pathways to Inclusion

Building a New Story with People and Communities

Pathways to Inclusion


Urban Land

Urban Land


Fool's Gold?

Utopianism in the Twenty-First Century

Fool's Gold?

What's wrong with the world today and how might it become better (or worse)? These are the questions pursued in this book, which explores the hopes and fears, dreams and nightmares of the 21st century. Through architecture, fiction, theory, film and experiments with everyday life, Sargisson explores contemporary hopes and fears about the future.