Climate Change and Small Island States

Power, Knowledge, and the South Pacific

Climate Change and Small Island States

Small Island Developing States are often depicted as being among the most vulnerable of all places to the effects of climate change, and they are a cause c?l?bre of many involved in climate science, politics and the media. Yet while small island developing states are much talked about, the production of both scientific knowledge and policies to protect the rights of these nations and their people has been remarkably slow.This book is the first to apply a critical approach to climate change science and policy processes in the South Pacific region. It shows how groups within politically and scientifically powerful countries appropriate the issue of island vulnerability in ways that do not do justice to the lives of island people. It argues that the ways in which islands and their inhabitants are represented in climate science and politics seldom leads to meaningful responses to assist them to adapt to climate change. Throughout, the authors focus on the hitherto largely ignored social impacts of climate change, and demonstrate that adaptation and mitigation policies cannot be effective without understanding the social systems and values of island societies.

Climate Change and Tradition in a Small Island State

The Rising Tide

Climate Change and Tradition in a Small Island State

The citizens of the Marshall Islands have been told that climate change will doom their country, and they have seen confirmatory omens in the land, air, and sea. This book investigates how grassroots Marshallese society has interpreted and responded to this threat as intimated by local observation, science communication, and Biblical exegesis. With grounds to dismiss or ignore the threat, Marshall Islanders have instead embraced it; with reasons to forswear guilt and responsibility, they have instead adopted in-group blame; and having been instructed that resettlement is necessary, they have vowed instead to retain the homeland. These dominant local responses can be understood as arising from a pre-existing, vigorous constellation of Marshallese ideas termed "modernity the trickster": a historically inspired narrative of self-inflicted cultural decline and seduction by Euro-American modernity. This study illuminates islander agency at the intersection of the local and the global, and suggests a theory of risk perception based on ideological commitment to narratives of historical progress and decline.

Climate Change in the South Pacific: Impacts and Responses in Australia, New Zealand, and Small Island States

Climate Change in the South Pacific: Impacts and Responses in Australia, New Zealand, and Small Island States

ALEXANDER GILLESPIE & WILLIAM C.G. BURNS The idea for this book grew out of the Ecopolitics conference in Canberra, Australia in 1996. The conference captured the ferment of the climate change debate in the South Pacific, as well as some its potential implications for the region’s inhabitants and e- systems. At that conference, one of the editors (Gillespie) delivered a paper on climate change issues in the region, as did Ros Taplin and Mark Diesendorf, who are also c- tributors to this volume. This book focuses on climate change issues in Australia, New Zealand, and the small island nations in the Pacific as the world struggles to cope with possible the impacts of environmental change and to formulate effective responses. While Australia and New Zealand’s per capita emissions of greenhouse gases are among the highest in the world, their aggregate contributions are small. However, both nations may exert a disprop- tionate influence in the global greenhouse debate because their obstinate positions at recent conferences of the parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on C- mate Change (FCCC) may provide justification for other developed nations, as well as developing countries, to refuse to make meaningful reductions in their greenhouse gas emissions.

Climate Change 2001: Synthesis Report

Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Climate Change 2001: Synthesis Report

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was set up jointly by UNEP and the World Meteorological Organisation in 1988 to provide periodic scientific analysis of the causes, impacts and possible policy response options to climate change issues. This synthesis report is the 4th and final part of the IPCC's third assessment report, and contains information on nine policy-relevant questions regarding the IPCC's 2001 assessment. It is intended to assist governments, individually and collectively, to formulate appropriate adaptation and mitigation responses to the threat of human-induced climate change.

Climate Change and Migration

South Pacific Perspectives

Climate Change and Migration

Many South Pacific island states are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Indeed, some are already experiencing population movement due to environmental events and processes likely to be exacerbated by future climate change. Yet others are at risk of disappearing altogether over the coming century and beyond. The potential for climate change to generate population movement over thecoming decades, therefore, raises substantial domestic and international policy challenges. This edited volume is the result of a conference held in Wellington in July 2009 that examined these and related issues. Drawing on a range of perspectives, this volume identifies concepts, frameworks, and possible policy responses to deal effectively with what may become one of the greatest humanitarian challengesof the 21st century.

Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security in Small Island Developing States

Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security in Small Island Developing States

With the potential to impact weather patterns, agriculture, and habitability of certain regions, global warming is a topic of interest to environmentalists, scientists, as well as farmers around the world. The threat of food shortages and famine especially becomes a major concern as a result of recent climate shifts. Impacts of Climate Change on Food Security in Small Island Developing States discusses the repercussions of a shifting climate on food production and availability in small island nations. Comprised of research-based chapters on topics relevant to crop management, sustainable development, and livestock management on island territories, this advanced reference work is appropriate for environmental researchers, food scientists, academicians, and upper-level students seeking the latest information on agricultural concerns amidst a changing climate.

Climate Change and Energy Insecurity

The Challenge for Peace, Security and Development

Climate Change and Energy Insecurity

Climate change is now recognised as one of the greatest challenges facing the international community and when coupled with energy production and use - the most significant contributor to climate change - and the related security problems the double threat to international security and human development is of the highest order. This wide-ranging book brings together leading thinkers from academia, government and civil society to examine and address the global insecurity and development challenges arising from the twin thrust of climate change and the energy supply crunch.Part one considers energy. It analyses the challenges of meeting future energy demands and the ongoing and future security-related conflicts over energy. Coverage includes security and development concerns related to the oil and gas, nuclear, bio-fuels and hydropower sectors, ensuring energy access for all and addressing sustainable consumption and production in both developed and rapidly industrializing countries such as India, China, Brazil and South Africa. Part two analyses how climate change contributes to global insecurity and presents a consolidated overview of the potential threats and challenges it poses to international peace and development. Coverage includes future water scenarios including a focus on scarcity in the Middle East, food security, biodiversity loss, land degradation, the changing economics of climate change, adaptation and the special case of small island states.The final part lays out the potential avenues and mechanisms available to the international community to address and avert climate and energy instability via the multilateral framework under the United Nations. It also addresses mechanisms for resource and knowledge transfer from industrialized to developing countries to ensure a low-carbon energy transition by focusing on the rapid deployment of clean energy technologies and ways to tackle income and employment insecurity created by the transition away from traditional energy sources. This book offers the most comprehensive international assessment of the challenges and solutions for tackling the global insecurity arising from climate change and energy provision and use. It is essential reading for students, researchers and professionals across international relations, security, climate change and the energy sectors.

Four Degrees of Global Warming

Australia in a Hot World

Four Degrees of Global Warming

At Copenhagen in December 2009, the international community agreed to limit global warming to below two degrees Celsius to avoid the worst impacts of human-induced climate change. However climate scientists agree that current national emissions targets collectively will still not achieve this goal. Instead, the ‘ambition gap’ between climate science and climate policy is likely to lead to average global warming of around four degrees Celsius by or before 2100. If a ‘Four Degree World’ is the de facto goal of policy, we urgently need to understand what this world might look like. Four Degrees of Global Warming: Australia in a Hot World outlines the expected consequences of this world for Australia and its region. Its contributors include many of Australia’s most eminent and internationally recognized climate scientists, climate policy makers and policy analysts. They provide an accessible, detailed, dramatic, and disturbing examination of the likely impacts of a Four Degree World on Australia’s social, economic and ecological systems. The book offers policy makers, politicians, students, and anyone interested climate change, access to the most recent research on potential Australian impacts of global warming, and possible responses.

The Economics of Climate Change in the Pacific

The Economics of Climate Change in the Pacific

The Pacific developing member countries of the Asian Development Bank are highly vulnerable to the predicted effects of climate change, including higher sea levels, intense storm surges and cyclones, erratic rainfall patterns, and major temperature fluctuations. This study identifies the effects and quantifies the costs of these adverse outcomes to the Pacific island economies, with details provided for selected key sectors including agriculture, fisheries, tourism, coral reefs, and human health. It then presents policy recommendations and action steps for the countries to minimize or mitigate these impacts, particularly by mainstreaming climate change in their development plans, adopting forward-looking and risk-based approaches to climate change, and climate-proofing both their programs and infrastructure so that poverty eradication and sustainable development efforts can continue regardless of the vagaries of climate.