Camp David

Camp David

Britain's Got Talent is BACK . . . so it's time to get serious with Britain's favourite funny man. Famous comedian and actor, funniest judge on Britain's Got Talent, high-achieving sportsman and BESTSELLING AUTHOR of The World's Worst Children series, David Walliams is a man of many talents . . . Launched to fame with the record-breaking Little Britain, his characters - Lou, Florence, Emily, amongst others - became embedded in our shared popular culture. You couldn't enter a playground for a long while without hearing "eh, eh, eh" or "computer says no". And Walliams is a mystery. Often described as a bundle of contradictions, he is disarming and enigmatic, playing up his campness one minute and hinting about his depression the next. To read Camp David is to be truly shocked, as well as tickled pink: David Walliams bares his soul like never before and reveals a fascinating and complex mind. This searingly honest autobiography is a true roller-coaster ride of emotions, as this nation's sweetheart unlocks closely guarded secrets that until now have remained hidden in his past. 'Will surprise, entertain, and allow fans and newcomers to enter the comic's uniquely brilliant world' GQ Magazine 'Raucously funny and superbly written' Heat 'Hilarious' Telegraph 'A great read. My only criticism is it ended too soon' The Sun 'A fascinating read' Star Magazine 'Brilliantly written' Express 'Fascinating stuff' Closer 'Uproariously great' Guardian

Camp David

Peacemaking and Politics

Camp David

"The most authoritative account of a major historic event, written with scrupulous scholarship by a key behind-the-scenes participant."—Zbigniew Brzezinski, Adviser to the President for National Security Affairs, 1977-81 ". . . an excellent piece of work . . . will represent a major contribution to the academic literature on American Middle East policy during the Carter administration. No one but Bill Quandt could, in my view, write so knowledgeable, yet so judiciously balanced, and account."—Hermann Frederick Eilts, Director Boston University Center for International Relations, and Ambassador to Egypt, 1973-79 "In his detailed, carefully balanced and meticulously researched history of the Carter administration's goal in helping Israel and Egype achieve peace, Bill Quandt has produced an admirable model of contemporary historical writing . . . a major contribution to the literature on the Middle East."—Samuel W. Lewis, Diplomat-in-Residence, The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Ambassador to Israel, 1977-85 "This book is likely to remain the most thoroughly researched and complete account by far of the Camp David negotiations and the American policymaking leading up to them to be written by an American participant. It is unique in its scholarship, its authority and its insight--and it is good reading."—Harold H. Saunders, Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, and former Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs, 1978-81.

President Is at Camp David

President Is at Camp David

With Khrushchev's visit, the "spirit of Camp David" came to symbolize one of the first thaws of the cold war. Other former Soviet Premiers would follow, including Leonid Brezhnev, who, it is said, was accompanied by a stewardess who spent the night in his cabin. It was in this tranquil setting that Lyndon B. Johnson imported aides to plan and debate the Vietnam War. After his reelection, Nixon went to the mountaintop to reorganize his administration. In the meantime, he had secret taping devices installed in the presidential lodge. It was Jimmy Carter, though, who restored Camp David's international fame by using it for the intense negotiations to achieve peace between Israel and Egypt.

West Asia Since Camp David

West Asia Since Camp David


Camp David Accords

Camp David Accords

First published in 1986. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Camp David

Peacemaking and Politics

Camp David

In September 1978, William Quandt, a member of the White House National Security Council staff, spent thirteen momentous days at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland, where three world leaders were holding secret negotiations. When U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin emerged on September 17, they announced a monumental accomplishment: the first peace agreement between Israel and one of its Arab neighbors. Praised by some for laying the foundations for peace between Egypt and Israel, the accords have also been criticized for failing to achieve a comprehensive settlement, including a resolution of the Palestinian question. But supporters and critics alike recognize the importance of what happened at Camp David, and both groups acknowledge the vital role played by the United States in reaching an agreement. There are few eyewitness accounts of the Camp David negotiations. Of the three leaders present, only Jimmy Carter wrote specifically of the talks in Keeping Faith: Memoirs of a President (1982). Neither Sadat nor Begin ever wrote about Camp David. Quandt's book is not only an eyewitness account but a scholar's reconstruction of the event, with insights into the people, politics, and policies. His Camp David has provided a comprehensive and lasting guide to the difficult negotiations surrounding the talks, including the fraught scenario leading up to the meetings at the presidential retreat and the accord that would lead to Sadat and Begin jointly receiving the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize. Praise for Camp David: Peacemaking and Politics "The most authoritative account of a major historic event, written with scrupulous scholarship by a key behind-the-scenes participant." —Zbigniew Brzezinski, Adviser to the President for National Security Affairs, 1977–81 "An excellent piece of work... will represent a major contribution to the acade

The Truth About Camp David

The Untold Story About the Collapse of the Middle East Peace Process

The Truth About Camp David

The collapse of both sets of Arab-Israeli negotiations in 2000 led not only to recrimination and bloodshed, with the outbreak of the second intifada, but to the creation of a new myth. Syrian and Palestinian intransigence was blamed for the current disastrous state of affairs, as both parties rejected a "generous" peace offering from the Israelis that would have brought peace to the region. The Truth About Camp David shatters that myth. Based on the riveting, eyewitness accounts of more than forty direct participants involved in the latest rounds of Arab-Israeli negotiations, including the Camp David 2000 summit, former federal investigator-turned-investigative journalist Clayton E. Swisher provides a compelling counter-narrative to the commonly accepted history. The Truth About Camp David details the tragic inner workings of the Clinton Administration's negotiating mayhem, their eleventh hour blunders and miscalculations, and their concluding decision to end the Oslo process with blame and disengagement. It is not only a fascinating historical look at Middle East politics on the brink of disaster, but a revelatory portrait of how all-too-human American political considerations helped facilitate the present crisis.

Camp David Presidents

Their Families and the World

Camp David Presidents

Camp David Presidents - Their Families and the World describes in non-sensational prose why Camp David is shrouded in secrecy, and why you can?t go there. From its early beginnings as a CCC camp renamed Shangri-La by FDR to its current status as a favorite Presidential retreat, Jack Behrens takes the reader on a journey through the camp?s history and explores each President?s time at the camp.

Night of Camp David

Night of Camp David

“What would happen if the president of the U.S.A. went stark-raving mad?” Back by popular demand, The New York Times calls the 1965 bestselling political thriller by the author of Seven Days in May, “A little too plausible for comfort.” How can one man convince the highest powers in Washington that the President of the United States is dangerously unstable—before it’s too late? Senator Jim MacVeagh is proud to serve his country—and his president, Mark Hollenbach, who has a near-spotless reputation as the vibrant, charismatic leader of MacVeagh’s party and the nation. When Hollenbach begins taking MacVeagh into his confidence, the young senator knows that his star is on the rise. But then Hollenbach starts summoning MacVeagh in the middle of the night to Camp David. There, the president sits in the dark and rants about his enemies, unfurling insane theories about all the people he says are conspiring against him. They would do anything, President Hollenbach tells the stunned senator, to stop him from setting in motion the grand, unprecedented plans he has to make America a great world power once again. MacVeagh comes away from these meetings increasingly convinced that the man he once admired has lost his mind. But what can he do? Who can he tell?

Camp David: Spectacle of Retreat

Camp David: Spectacle of Retreat

Camp David: Spectacle of Retreat documents an academic research project on contemporary geopolitics and architecture conducted at Tyler School of Art, Temple University. During the advanced research studio with Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss, the final year students at Tyler's Architecture program, explored the myth of Camp David as a known US presidential retreat and speculated on its alternative futures as a retirement facility retreat for a selected number of dictators from the world.