The Apostle Paul and the Pauline Tradition

The Apostle Paul and the Pauline Tradition

Much of the popular understanding of the apostle Paul has been shaped, not by Paul's letters themselves, but by the Acts of the Apostles. This understanding, many believe, leads to misunderstanding Paul's theology. In The Apostle Paul and the Pauline Tradition Stephen Finlan takes a new approach, focusing on the letters themselves. He views the Pauline tradition as including the teachings and writings of Paul himself, the assimilation and often simplification of Paul's ideas by those who followed him and then wrote letters in his name, and the final form of the letters the church has labeled as Paul's. Through this broad, shifting, and expanding notion of tradition, readers will explore with Finlan such questions as: ' What did Paul really think 'and write 'about Jesus, redemption, and the Christian life? ' Who were the original audiences that first received these texts? ' How and how much did Paul's followers change his ideas in the letters they wrote for" him? Finlan is convinced that this educated questioning and investigating becomes a valid part of the life of faith 'not replacing faith, but joined to it. Through his accessibly written text, readers in the end will understand and agree. Stephen Finlan, PhD, is an adjunct professor at Drew University and has taught at Fordham. He is also author of Problems with Atonement and Options on Atonement in Christian Thought (both published by Liturgical Press) as well as The Background and Content of Paul's Cultic Atonement Metaphors (SBL and Brill, 2004). "

The Apostle Paul

An Introduction to His Writings and Teaching

The Apostle Paul

This dynamic new consideration of Paul addresses the three basic subjects that make up Pauline Studies -- Paul's life, letters, and theology -- and argues that these elements must be treated together since to do otherwise risks distorting one or more of the areas of studies.

Four Views on the Apostle Paul

Four Views on the Apostle Paul

The apostle Paul was a vital force in the development of Christianity. Paul’s historical and religious context affects the theological interpretation of Paul’s writings, no small issue in the whole of Christian theology. Recent years have seen much controversy about the apostle Paul, his religious and social context, and its effects on his theology. In the helpful Counterpoints format, four leading scholars present their views on the best framework for describing Paul’s theological perspective, including his view of salvation, the significance of Christ, and his vision for the churches. Contributors and views include: Reformed View: Thomas R. Schreiner Catholic View: Luke Timothy Johnson Post-New Perspective View: Douglas Campbell Jewish View: Mark D. Nanos Like other titles in the Counterpoints: Bible and Theology collection, Four Views on the Apostle Paul gives theology students the tools they need to draw informed conclusions on debated issues. General editor and New Testament scholar Michael F. Bird covers foundational issues and provides helpful summaries in his introduction and conclusion. New Testament scholars, pastors, and students of Christian history and theology will find Four Views on the Apostle Paul an indispensable introduction to ongoing debates on the apostle Paul’s life and teaching.

The Apostle

A Life of Paul

The Apostle

The Acclaimed, Authentic Biography of the Early Church's Greatest Evangelist--the Apostle Paul.Master storyteller John Pollock makes Paul and his amazing story freshly alive, so that you can know the greatest apostle much as Luke and Timothy did as they traveled with him. As you turn the pages, you'll sense Paul's motives, his aims and priorities; what mattered to him; and what he was willing to die for.

The Apostle

The Life of Paul

The Apostle

The Acclaimed, Authentic Biography of the Early Church's Greatest Evangelist--the Apostle Paul.Master storyteller John Pollock makes Paul and his amazing story freshly alive, so that you can know the greatest apostle much as Luke and Timothy did as they traveled with him. As you turn the pages, you'll sense Paul's motives, his aims and priorities; what mattered to him; and what he was willing to die for.

The First Urban Christians

The Social World of the Apostle Paul

The First Urban Christians

Meeks analyzes the letters of Paul to see what kind of people joined the Christian groups in the urban centers and what it was like to be a Christian then.

The Apostle Paul and the Christian Life

Ethical and Missional Implications of the New Perspective

The Apostle Paul and the Christian Life

The "new perspective" on Paul, an approach that seeks to reinterpret the apostle Paul and his letters against the backdrop of first-century Judaism, has been criticized by some as not having value for ordinary Christians living ordinary lives. In this volume, world-renowned scholars explore the implications of the new perspective on Paul for the Christian life and church. James D. G. Dunn, N. T. Wright, Bruce Longenecker, Scot McKnight, and other leading New Testament scholars offer a response to this question: How does the apostle Paul understand the Christian life? The book makes a fresh contribution to the new perspective on Paul conversation and offers important new insights into the orientation of the Christian life.

Paul

The Apostle of Jesus Christ : His Life and Works, His Epistles and Teachings : a Contribution to a Critical History of Primitive Christianity

Paul


The Apostle Paul and His Letters

The Apostle Paul and His Letters

'The Apostle Paul and His Letters' presents a detailed examination of the apostle's seminal writings in the Book of Acts. Paul was writing primarily to converts who had joined church communities only recently, mostly forsaking either Judaism or paganism. Paul's emphases on faithfulness toward God, the faithfulness of Jesus, and his moral teachings are always primary themes. The book discusses a range of topics: the circumstances that led Paul to write each letter; Paul's emphasis on the morality of the believers to whom he was writing; the influence of Old Testament, Qumran, and pagan writings on Paul's own; the intellectual and cultural context of the time; and how careful attention to Paul's language can shed light on his meaning. This book is written for a wide range of interested readers, including students, pastors, church workers and others interested in learning about Paul as a person and his work.