Broadway Boogie Woogie

Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture

Broadway Boogie Woogie

While analyzing Damon Runyon's high spirited work in terms of historical contexts, popular culture, and of the changing function of the media, Schwarz argues that in his columns and stories Runyon was an indispensable figure in creating our public images of New York City culture, including our interest in the demi-monde and underworld that explains in part the success of The Godfather films and The Sopranos . In his lively and exuberant chapters that include a panoramic view of New York City between the World Wars - with a focus on its colourful nightlife - Schwarz examines virtually every facet of Runyon's career from sports writer, daily columnist, trial reporter, and Hollywood figure to the author of the still widely-read short stories that were the source of the Broadway hit Guys and Dolls . As part of his discussion of Runyon's art and the artistry of Runyon's fiction, Schwarz skilfully examines the special language of the Broadway stories known as 'Runyonese', and explains how 'Runyonese' has become an adjective for describing flamboyant behaviour.

Broadway Boogie Woogie

Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture

Broadway Boogie Woogie

A fresh look at the works and legacy of a beloved New York writer.

Painting as Model

Painting as Model

Essays that seek to redefine the status of theory in modernist critical discourse

The Story of Boogie-Woogie

A Left Hand Like God

The Story of Boogie-Woogie

The Story of Boogie-Woogie: A Left Hand Like God examines the socio-historical background of the boogie-woogie piano style, from its early appearances in the barrelhouses of lumber, turpentine, and railroad camps in the southern United States, to its emergence at rent parties in Chicago and St. Louis, to its rise as a popular form of music in the nightclubs of New York, to its status as an international craze during World War II. In this enhanced revision of A Left Hand Like God, Peter J. Silvester presents a comprehensive history of boogie-woogie, describing the style's appearance and development, its offshoots, and the pianists who made it famous, and studying its impact on rhythm and blues, urban blues, and big band swing, leading to the eventual revival of 'classical' boogie-woogie in concerts and festivals. Silvester discusses significant European and American pianists of boogie-woogie throughout history, providing biographical information about their life styles and musical influences and offering an analysis of their important recordings. The book also includes a new chapter on the contribution of national and independent record companies to the recording of boogie-woogie music. A thorough bibliography and a final appendix providing many of the bass patterns common in boogie-woogie make this a valuable reference.

Mondrian

The Art of Destruction

Mondrian

This volume analyzes the interrelation between Dutch artist Piet Mondrian's (1872-1944) paintings and his theories on art and life as expressed in public writings and (largely unpublished) letters. Mondrian was an important contributor to the De Stijl art movement and group, which was founded by Theo van Doesburg. He evolved a non-representational form which he termed Neo-Plasticism. This consisted of white ground, upon which was painted a grid of vertical and horizontal black lines and the three primary colors. The author concentrates on his paintings, the artist's major achievement, examining the influences that shaped his art: Fauvism and Cubism, the work of Bart van der Leck, De Stijl and the Parisian art world during the 1920s. The author concludes that Mondrian appears not as an isolated figure, but as an artist who took a keen interest in the world around him, a veritable avant-garde painter who saw his role as a creator of a new, modern culture.

Translating Jazz Into Poetry

From Mimesis to Metaphor

Translating Jazz Into Poetry

The study develops a new theoretical approach to the relationship between two media (jazz music and writing) and demonstrates its explanatory power with the help of a rich sampling of jazz poems. Currently, the mimetic approach to intermediality (e.g., the notion that jazz poetry imitates jazz music) still dominates the field of criticism. This book challenges that interpretive approach. It demonstrates that a mimetic view of jazz poetry hinders readers from perceiving the metaphoric ways poets rendered music in writing. Drawing on and extending recent cognitive metaphor theories (Lakoff, Johnson, Turner, Fauconnier), it promotes a conceptual metaphor model that allows readers to discover the innovative ways poets translate “melody,” “dynamics,” “tempo,” “mood,” and other musical elements into literal and figurative expressions that invite readers to imagine the music in their mind’s eye (i.e., their mind’s ear).

Music and Modern Art

Music and Modern Art

Music and Modern Art adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the relationship between these two fields of creative endeavor.

Both Worlds at Once

Art in Old Age

Both Worlds at Once

Both Worlds at Once is a study of works of art conceived and produced late in their creators' careers. It pronounces an alternative to the mainstream life span creativity research which has, in general, adopted a decline perspective to the fruits of old age. Amir Cohen-Shalev argues that this age-decrement approach misses what the artists themselves tried to do in old age, which is often to develop a new form that allows them to thrive on ambivalence. Against the bleak predictions of developmental psychology and folk wisdom, this book focuses on old age as a unique stage of creative activity.

Art in Science

Selections from EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Art in Science

Since 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published Emerging Infectious Diseases, a public health journal that endeavors to improve scientific understanding of disease emergence, prevention, and elimination. Widely known for its leading research in infectious disease, EID is also recognized for its unique aesthetic, which brings together visual art from across periods and, through prose, makes it relatable to the journal's science-minded readership. In Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases, the journal's highly popular fine-art covers are contextualized with essays that address how the featured art relates to science, and to us all. Through the combined covers and essays, the journal's contents -- topics such as infections, contagions, disease emergence, antimicrobial resistance -- find larger context amid topics such as poverty and war, the hazards of global travel, natural disasters, and human-animal interactions. This collection of 92 excerpts and covers from Emerging Infectious Diseases will be of interest to readers of the journal or to anyone who wishes to reach across the aisle between art and science.