Aurora

The Northern Lights in Mythology, History and Science

Aurora

During long winter nights, the light of the aurora borealis appears over the sparcely populated north. Little is known, however, about these dazzling displays of ghostly light and movement. The author discusses the history, mythology, and science behind auroras. Demonstrating the influence of the sun in the aurora's creation, he also compares the northern lights with phenomena such as lightning and rainbows. Lavishly illustrated with numerous color and black and white pictures, Aurora offers a comprehensive understanding of a mysterious dynamic that has fascinated and even alarmed northern communities through the ages.

Aurora

Observing and Recording Nature's Spectacular Light Show

Aurora

This new book addresses a gap in the literature, offering an explanation of the aurora's causes, how the occurrence of major events may now be predicted, and how amateur observers can go about recording displays. This is the first serious book about aurora written for practical but non-professional observers. It provides a concise accessible description of the various auroral forms and how to record them, illustrated with color images of recent displays. It contains details of 'Space Weather' forecasting websites, how to interpret and use the information given on these, and how to anticipate auroral activity.

Aurora

Aurora

The history of Aurora, Illinois is one of diversity. This is the first book to trace the city's early days of its first white settlement through World War I and the early 1920s, as seen through the eyes of its diverse ethnic groups. Immigrants from northern, southern, and eastern Europe, southern Blacks, and Mexicans all came to provide their talents to the massive railroad industry and the dozens of factories in the city, which were producing various products to be used by the entire nation and as well as in the construction of the Panama Canal.

Aurora

Aurora

Humans are running out of time. The universe is turning against them, the unknown will soon destroy its slaves. Will the angels find those who are pure before time runs out?

Aurora

Aurora

Located in northeastern Ohio, Aurora began as part of the Connecticut Western Reserve and drew many of its first settlers from New England. The city was founded in 1799, with its residents making their living from hunting, farming, and milling. As settlers cleared the land, planted their crops, and raised their animals, they retained their New England heritage, reflected in the many "century homes" found in the town. The area remained largely rural until the mid-20th century, with dairy farmers shipping cheese all over the country and to Europe from 1850 to 1910. Aurora has served as a bedroom community from the 1900s to the 1960s, and Geauga Lake has been a vacation destination since the 1860s. Currently Aurora retains much of its rural charm with Audubon lands, nature reserves, and many lakes and wetlands.

Aurora

Aurora

Aurora began as the town of Fletcher, named after the Denver businessman who had staked out the original four square miles for resale along with associates Samuel and Francis Perry. In 1907, burdened with debt from their founder and seeking a fresh start, the inhabitants of Fletcher petitioned to have the town renamed, and in April, it was officially dubbed the Town of Aurora. These first settlers overcame many obstacles on the bare, dry land that Maj. Stephen Long, an early explorer, called "the Great American Desert." The outbreak of World War I brought revenue to the area's farmers as food prices soared, and Fitzsimons Army Hospital was established in 1918. Over the years, the scarcity of water has been a persistent problem, but Aurora has nonetheless grown from a quiet farming community to a sprawling city covering over 144 square miles.

The Aurora Farmers Fair

100 Years

The Aurora Farmers Fair

In 1908, the Aurora Business Mens Association decided to bring a celebration to its sleepy river town. Little did these men realize that the Aurora Farmers Fair would bring their community together for the next 100 years. During the 1909 fall festival, Second and Main Streets were blocked off and lined with farm exhibits and storefronts were decorated. There were over 700 entries and 12,000 people attended. Every year merchants and manufacturers parade, and contestants are selected from area schools to compete for a place in the royal court that presides over the festivities. Class reunions and family homecomings are held around the event, and schoolchildren are released early to participate in a bicycle and pet parade. In 1959, the Aurora Business Mens Association ceded management and sponsorship of the fair to the Aurora Lions Club, and in 1969, the Lions Club purchased a beautiful old building from the Aurora Casket Company to house exhibits. Sadly, in 1998, arson destroyed the fair building, and years' worth of fair history was lost. This book has been created, in part, in an effort to regain a portion of the collection that was lost.

Aurora

Aurora

Covered wagons brought a wave of migration to northern Illinois in the mid-1830s. On April 1, 1834, the first permanent white settlers, Joseph McCarthy and two assistants, paddled up the Fox River. The vicinity was known as Waubonsie’s Village at that time. They built a log cabin, a dam across the Fox, and eventually a sawmill. The village had about 400 Native Americans who bartered fish for bread and tobacco. For almost 175 years now, growth has been steady and sure, and the city of Aurora is the second-largest metropolitan area in Illinois. Aurora is home to honorable civic institutions, excellent education, and a multicultural and energetic population.