An End to Poverty?

A Historical Debate

An End to Poverty?

In the 1790s, for the first time, reformers proposed bringing poverty to an end. Inspired by scientific progress, the promise of an international economy, and the revolutions in France and the United States, political thinkers such as Thomas Paine and Antoine-Nicolas Condorcet argued that all citizens could be protected against the hazards of economic insecurity. In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and examines how it was derailed by conservative as well as leftist thinkers. By tracing the historical evolution of debates concerning poverty, Stedman Jones revives an important, but forgotten strain of progressive thought. He also demonstrates that current discussions about economic issues -- downsizing, globalization, and financial regulation -- were shaped by the ideological conflicts of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Paine and Condorcet believed that republicanism combined with universal pensions, grants to support education, and other social programs could alleviate poverty. In tracing the inspiration for their beliefs, Stedman Jones locates an unlikely source-Adam Smith. Paine and Condorcet believed that Smith's vision of a dynamic commercial society laid the groundwork for creating economic security and a more equal society. But these early visions of social democracy were deemed too threatening to a Europe still reeling from the traumatic aftermath of the French Revolution and increasingly anxious about a changing global economy. Paine and Condorcet were demonized by Christian and conservative thinkers such as Burke and Malthus, who used Smith's ideas to support a harsher vision of society based on individualism and laissez-faire economics. Meanwhile, as the nineteenth century wore on, thinkers on the left developed more firmly anticapitalist views and criticized Paine and Condorcet for being too "bourgeois" in their thinking. Stedman Jones however, argues that contemporary social democracy should take up the mantle of these earlier thinkers, and he suggests that the elimination of poverty need not be a utopian dream but may once again be profitably made the subject of practical, political, and social-policy debates.

How to End Poverty in the World in Just 15 Years

How to End Poverty in the World in Just 15 Years

Today, with so much know-how existing on this planet, there are still billions of people in extreme poverty. Outside of developed countries, a large part of humanity lives in poverty, and governments of the majority of countries do not know what to do to bring prosperity to the countries they rule. The people who live in poor countries have lost hope and do not know what to do to solve the chronic problem of poverty they live in. These people have accepted poverty as a fact or something they cannot do anything about. The unique solution that many people find is to travel to a rich country and become illegal immigrants. But is poverty really a problem nobody can do anything about? Can all the people of the world solve the problem of poverty and live a life characterized by prosperity like the one found in the United States? If you want to know the answer to these two questions, this book is for you. In this book, I will describe a brand new economic model that, as you will see, will be able to bring prosperity to any country in the world, and bring the standards of living of the poorest countries in the world today to the standards of the most developed countries in as little as fifteen years. So hold your breath and read this book, and you will see how I leave no stone unturned when proposing a new economic model that will be able to put an end to poverty in the world within our lifetime; culminating in the establishment of a perfect society on earth; a society where reigns harmony, peace and love.

Theory of World Security

Theory of World Security

What is real? What can we know? How might we act? This book sets out to answer these fundamental philosophical questions in a radical and original theory of security for our times. Arguing that the concept of security in world politics has long been imprisoned by conservative thinking, Ken Booth explores security as a precious instrumental value which gives individuals and groups the opportunity to pursue the invention of humanity rather than live determined and diminished lives. Booth suggests that human society globally is facing a set of converging historical crises. He looks to critical social theory and radical international theory to develop a comprehensive framework for understanding the historical challenges facing global business-as-usual and for planning to reconstruct a more cosmopolitan future. Theory of World Security is a challenge both to well-established ways of thinking about security and alternative approaches within critical security studies.

Ending Global Poverty

A Guide to What Works

Ending Global Poverty

Over 800 million people suffer from chronic hunger, and over ten million children die each year from preventable causes. These may seem like overwhelming statistics, but as Stephen Smith shows in this call to arms, global poverty is something that we can and should solve within our lifetimes. Ending Global Poverty explores the various traps that keep people mired in poverty, traps like poor nutrition, illiteracy, lack of access to health care, and others and presents eight keys to escaping these traps. Smith gives readers the tools they need to help people overcome poverty and to determine what approaches are most effective in fighting it. For example, celebrities in commercials who encourage viewers to "adopt" a poor child really seem to care, but will sending money to these organizations do the most good? Smith explains how to make an informed decision. Grass-roots programs and organizations are helping people gain the capabilities they need to escape from poverty and this book highlights many of the most promising of these strategies in some of the poorest countries in the world, explaining what they do and what makes them effective.

The End of Poverty

Economic Possibilities for Our Time

The End of Poverty

An international economic advisor shares a wide-spectrum theory about how to enable economic success throughout the world, posing solutions to top political, environmental, and social problems that contribute to poverty.

Our Day to End Poverty

24 Ways You Can Make a Difference: Easyread Large Bold Edition

Our Day to End Poverty


The Oxfam Poverty Report

The Oxfam Poverty Report

Fifty years ago, the United Nations Charter proclaimed universal rights to shared prosperity, peace, and security. How far has that vision of world citizenship been realised? Despite advances in human welfare and technology, there is today a growing polarisation between rich and poor. One in four of the world's people live in absolute poverty, unable to meet their basic needs; armed conflict is affecting millions of people; and the global environment is under threat. Yet there is a failure of political will to address the silent emergency of poverty. The Oxfam Poverty Report draws on Oxfam's experience of working in over 70 countries, to examine the causes of poverty and conflict. It identifies the structural forces which deny people their basic rights, and gives a wide range of examples of the ways in which men and women are bringing about positive change at every level, from the household to the international arena. Oxfam believes that it is time to renew the UN vision of universal basic rights. The Report concludes by proposing policy and institutional reforms which would transform international institutions and trading relations, and calls for a new commitment to work together to eradicate poverty and bring sustainable peace and security for all the world's people.

Psychology, Poverty, and the End of Social Exclusion

Putting Our Practice to Work

Psychology, Poverty, and the End of Social Exclusion

Laura Smith argues that if there is any segment of society that should be concerned with the impact of classism and poverty, it is those within the “helping professions”—people who have built their careers around understanding and facilitating human emotional well-being. In this groundbreaking book, Smith charts the ebbs and flows of psychology’s consideration of poor clients, and then points to promising new approaches to serving poor communities that go beyond remediation, sympathy, and charity. Including the author’s own experiences as a psychologist in a poor community, this inspiring book: Shows practitioners and educators how to implement considerations of social class and poverty within mental health theory and practice.Addresses poverty from a true social class perspective, beginning with questions of power and oppression in health settings.Presents a view of poverty that emerges from the words of the poor through their participation in interviews and qualitative research.Offers a message of hope that poor clients and psychologists can reinvent their relationship through working together in ways that are liberating for all parties. Laura Smith is an assistant professor in the department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. “Gripping, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful, [this]is an impassioned charge to mental health professionals to advocate in truly helpful ways for America’s poor and working-class citizens . . . beautifully written and structured in a way that provides solid information with digestible doses of in-your-face depictions of poverty . . . Smith’s appeal to the healing profession is a gift. She envisions a class-inclusive society that shares common resources, opportunities, institutions, and hope. Smith’s book is a beautiful, chilling treatise calling for social change, mapping the road that will ultimately lead to that change. . . . This inspired book . . . is not meant to be purchased, perused, and placed on a shelf. It is meant to be lived. Are you in?” —PsycCRITIQUES magazine “Smith does not invite you to examine the life of the poor; she forces you to do it. And after you do it, you cannot help but question your practice. Whether you are a psychologist, a social worker, a counselor, a nurse, a psychiatrist, a teacher, or a community organizer, you will gain insights about the lives of the people you work with.” —From the Foreword by Isaac Prilleltensky, Dean, School of Education, University of Miami, Florida “This groundbreaking book challenges practitioners and educators to rethink dominant understandings of social class and poverty, and it offers concrete strategies for addressing class-based inequities. Psychology, Poverty, and the End of Social Exclusion should be required reading for anyone interested in economic and social justice.” —Heather Bullock, University of California, Santa Cruz