Against the Market

Political Economy, Market Socialism and the Marxist Critique

Against the Market

In this innovative book, David McNally develops a powerful critique of market socialism, by tracing it back to its roots in early political economy. He ranges from Adam Smith's attempt to reconcile moral philosophy with market economics to Malthus's reformulation of Smith's political economy which made it possible to justify poverty as a moral necessity. Smith's economic theory was also the source of an attempt to construct a critique of capitalism derived from his conception of free and equal exchange governed by natural price. This Smithian forerunner of today's market socialism sought to reform the market without abolishing the social relations on which it was based. McNally explores this tradition sympathetically, but exposes its fatal flaws. The book concludes with an incisive consideration of efforts by writers such as Alec Nove to construct a “feasible” model of market socialism. McNally shows these efforts are still plagued by the failure of early Smithian socialism to come to grips with the social foundations of the market, the commodification of labor-power which is the key to market regulation of the economy. The results, he argues, are neither socialist nor workable.

Feminine Economies

Thinking Against the Market in the Enlightenment and the Late Twentieth Century

Feminine Economies

Contemporary theory has been exercised by the question of the gift - whether there is some mode of relation that escapes the dominant paradigm of market exchange. This work focuses both on the latter part of the 20th century and on the key pre-text of the Enlightenment, a moment in which the market economy as we know it today was becoming established and the terms of today's debates were being shaped.

Free the Market!

Why Only Government Can Keep the Marketplace Competitive

Free the Market!

Why we need government intervention in the free market to protect competition and encourage innovation Starting about thirty years ago, conservatives forced an overhaul of competition policy that has loosened business rules for everything from selling products to buying competitors. Gary Reback thinks the changes have gone too far. Today's competition policies, he argues, were made for the old manufacturing economy of the 1970s. But in a high-tech world, these policies actually slow innovation, hurt consumers, and entrench big companies at the expense of entrepreneurs. Free the Market! is both a memoir of Reback's titanic legal battles—involving top companies such as Apple, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, and AT&T—and a persuasive argument for measured government intervention in the free market to foster competition. Among the fascinating questions he considers: Can a company ever compete too hard for the public good? Should policy makers worry more about promoting competition or improving efficiency? Does it help consumers when a manufacturer sets the prices its retailers charge? Should the government do more to stop controversial mergers? At what point does intellectual property protection hurt innovation?

Firing Back

Against the Tyranny of the Market 2

Firing Back

Globalization's threat to artists and intellectuals, and how they can rebut it. Pierre Bourdieu, described by The Nation as "worthy of the militant mantle of Sartre and Foucault," here continues the themes advanced so successfully in his previous book Acts of Resistance. Firing Back is an eloquent dissection of globalization's intellectual and cultural role throughout the world, and a discussion of the ways in which effective opposition to it can be mounted. Bourdieu examines Europe's potential as a counterweight to America's globalizing policy and discusses how intellectuals and those working in the cultural sphere can create meaningful alternatives. He also raises challenging questions about the depoliticization of the academic world, arguing that scholars can no longer maintain that their research is objective or value-free.

The Sceptical Investor

How Contrarians Bet Against the Market and Win - and You Can Too

The Sceptical Investor

Everyone wants to be a contrarian investor. From the hedge funds who bet against the US housing market in the run up to 2008, to George Soros's billion-dollar bet against the Bank of England in 1992, some of the most famous and most profitable trades in history have been contrarian calls. And with the relentless growth of passive investing - investors blindly following the market - the opportunities for a smart investor to profit by betting against the crowd should be greater than ever. Yet being a contrarian is hard work. It takes patience, the conviction to stand by an unpopular viewpoint, and the mental toughness to endure being 'wrong' for prolonged periods of time. Standing out from the crowd goes against our every natural instinct. Which is, of course, why it works. So how do you go about it? There is no single, mechanical investment approach that marks an investor out as a contrarian. Instead, you need to adopt a sceptical mindset: a flexible mode of thinking that allows you to stand back and spot when the market's view of the world is badly out of touch with reality - and the best way to profit when reality eventually reasserts itself. In The Sceptical Investor, John Stepek, executive editor of MoneyWeek, pulls together the latest research on behavioural finance, and examples from well-known contrarian investors, to offer practical techniques to help you to spot opportunities in common investment situations, from turnaround plays to bubbles and busts, that others in the market miss. It won't make you popular and it won't make you famous. But it will make you money.

Escape from the Market

Negotiating Work in Lancashire

Escape from the Market

This book describes how wages were set in post-industrial revolution Lancashire.

Does EU Merger Control Discriminate Against Small Market Companies?

Diagnosing the Argument with Conclusions

Does EU Merger Control Discriminate Against Small Market Companies?

Although the question posed by the title of this book has generated considerable debate, the essential issue remains open and largely blurred. While some believe that there is no so-called 'small market problem', others discern discrimination against small market companies (i.e., companies with a strong position in their home markets but a modest position in the European and global markets) and a consequent need for changes in competition law. The author of this enormously helpful work here sets the stage for meaningful discussion by analysing the EC Merger Regulation's objectives, economic foundations, and application practice to present a reasoned view of the issues that can be considered relevant for such a discussion. Considering their effect on the 'small market problem', the author scrutinizes such factors as the following: the Commission's methodology for delineating relevant markets in merger assessments; unnecessary prohibition caused by overestimation of the market power of small market mergers; erroneous approval of cases that should actually be prohibited; impact of the so-called 'Harvard' and 'Chicago' schools of competition theory and their key policy implications; process-related alternative views of competition and new synthesizing approaches; relevant criteria for a proper analysis of market power; concentration measures and market shares; barriers to entry; price and profitability analyses; and product definition v. geographic definition of markets. In a final chapter, the author presents some tentative conclusions, normative in nature, concerning the problem and the relevant issues relating to it. As the first in-depth analysis of the issues that are actually involved - with its particular diagnosis of the assessment of market power in considering the relevant issues for the problem - this study brings into salience the terms of the debate on the 'problem', and thus takes a giant step forward towards defining what needs to be done. Competition lawyers, policymakers, and academics in Europe and elsewhere will find the discussion of great value.

Kidney Transplantation

Challenging the Future

Kidney Transplantation

This e-book is an overview of recent advances in the realm of kidney transplantation. The volume discusses developments in surgical procedures while presenting a perspective on possibilities for kidney transplant research in the future. The e-book is a c