Against Autonomy

Justifying Coercive Paternalism

Against Autonomy

Argues that laws that enforce what is good for the individual's well-being, or hinder what is bad, are morally justified.

Against Autonomy

Lyotard, Judgement and Action

Against Autonomy

This title was first published in 2001: Against Autonomy reassesses Jean-Francois Lyotard's contribution to philosophy and theory, and explores how his work challenges the privileged position of the principle of autonomy in contemporary liberal democratic thinking, as seen in such diverse thinkers as Rawls, Rorty and Fukuyama. Curtis argues that the political models autonomy legitimates are inadequate for thinking justice. Such models invariably promote self-legislation as the ground of freedom turning the subject away from its prior constitution by, and responsibility for, the Other. He explores Lyotard's reading of Kant as well as his responses to Levinas and Heidegger in order to rethink the political. Developing a regulative Idea based on new understandings of heteronomy and an-archy Curtis shows how Lyotard's argument that there are no criteria for justice does not mean judgement and action fall prey to decisionism and relativism, but that this lack of criteria commits us to a renewed sensitivity to events. Examining Lyotard's work in relation to Arendt's writings on the vita activa, this book explores themes of community, communication and action, suggesting how Lyotard's work calls for an alternative conception of political space. This book will be of particular interest to those studying communitarianism, liberalism, anarchism, post-structuralism and postmodernism, particularly within the context of political philosophy, ethics, and political and social theory. Neal Curtis is Lecturer in Communication Studies, Anglia Polytechnic University at Cambridge, UK

Against Autonomy

Global Dialectics of Cultural Exchange

Against Autonomy

This book investigates "cultural instruments," meaning normative forms of analysis and practice that are central to Western culture. It explores their history from antiquity to the early Enlightenment and their use and reworking by different cultures, moving from Europe to Africa and the Americas, especially the Caribbean, in the process giving close readings of a wide range of authors.

Seniors and Squalor: Competency, Autonomy, and the Mistake of Forced Intervention

Seniors and Squalor: Competency, Autonomy, and the Mistake of Forced Intervention

This book will help readers to better understand and address a strange social phenomenon: the apparent choice by some seniors to live in squalor. • Incorporates the latest research concerning laws and medical classifications • Offers the first in-depth treatment of legal and political theory questions underlying the issue of self-neglect by senior citizens • Includes policy approaches crafted to address the issue at a societal level • Raises ethical questions based in the role of government in solving social problems

Autonomy and Ethnic Conflict in South and South-East Asia

Autonomy and Ethnic Conflict in South and South-East Asia

This book uses empirical evidence from various case studies to examine the relationship between territorial and regional autonomy, the nation-state and ethnic conflict resolution in South and South-East Asia. The concept of territorial or regional autonomy holds centre stage in the literature on ethnic conflict settlement because it is supposed to be able to reconcile two paradoxical objectives: the preservation of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the state, and the satisfaction of ethnic minorities’ right to national self-determination. Critics argue, however, that autonomy may not be the panacea for ethnic conflict in all cases. The contributing authors begin with the concept of territorial or regional autonomy and subject it to a rigorous empirical analysis, which provides reliable evidence regarding the suitability of the autonomy solution to intractable ethnic conflicts. Drawing upon case studies from Kashmir, Assam, Sri Lanka, Aceh, Mindanao and Southern Thailand, this edited volume argues that autonomy arrangements may at best work to resolve only a handful of separatist ethnic conflicts in South and South-East Asia. This book will be of much interest to students of South and South-East Asia, Asian security, ethnic conflict, peace studies and IR in general.

National Integration and Contested Autonomy

The Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua

National Integration and Contested Autonomy

The indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples along Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast, once colonized by the British, have long sought to establish their autonomy vis-à-vis the dominant Spanish-influenced regions of the Pacific coast. The book provides a wide overview of the autonomy process by looking at the historical background of autonomy, claims to land and language rights, and land demarcation and communal forestry projects. This book seeks to satisfy the globally emerging interest in the idea of autonomy and bi-zonality as an effective mechanism of conflict resolution and protection of minority rights. The post-Cold War era has witnessed a resurgence of conflictive ethnic and secessionist politics that has placed the taken-for-granted primacy of unitary, sovereign nation-states into question. Along with cases such as Cyprus, Northern Ireland, and the Basque regions of Spain, Nicaragua sought to resolve prolonged and protracted ethnic conflict, issues of minority rights to self-determination, and questions concerning the sovereignty of national states, through an autonomy process that extended beyond a narrow political settlement to include the exercise of cultural rights and control of local resources. Autonomy on Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast remains highly contested, being simultaneously characterized by progress, setbacks and violent confrontation within a number of fields and involving a multiplicity of actors; local, national and global. This experience offers critical lessons for efforts around the world that seek to resolve long-established and deep-seated ethnic conflict by attempting to reconcile the need for development, usually fostered by national governments, with the protection of minority rights advocated by marginalized minorities living within nation states.

"Nagging" Questions

Feminist Ethics in Everyday Life

In this anthology of new and classic articles, fifteen noted feminist philosophers explore contemporary ethical issues that uniquely affect the lives of women. These issues in applied ethics include autonomy, responsibility, sexual harassment, women in the military, new technologies for reproduction, surrogate motherhood, pornography, abortion, nonfeminist women and others. Whether generated by old social standards or intensified by recent technology, these dilemmas all pose persistent, 'nagging, ' questions that cry out for answers. Unlike other anthologies in feminist ethics, this book encourages critical thinking about concrete, contemporary social and moral issues. Each engaging, clearly written article is followed by discussion questions, making the book useful for students of women's studies, philosophy, sociology, and political science

Natural Theology Versus Theology of Nature?

Tillich's Thinking as Impetus for a Discourse Among Theology, Philosophy, and Natural Sciences : the IVth International Paul Tillich Symposium, Held in Frankfurt/Main, 1992

Natural Theology Versus Theology of Nature?


Rights to Health Care

Rights to Health Care

Human existence is marked by pain, limitation, disability, disease, suffering, and death. These facts of life and of death give ample grounds for characterizing much of the human condition as unfortunate. A core philosophical question is whether the circumstances are in addition unfair or unjust in the sense of justifying claims on the resources, time, and abilities of others. The temptation to use the languages of rights and of justice is und- standable. Faced with pain, disability, and death, it seems natural to complain that "someone should do something", "this is unfair", or "it just isn't fight that people should suffer this way". Yet it is one thing to complain about the unfairness of another's actions, and another thing to complain about the unfairness of biological or physical processes. If no one is to blame for one's illness, disability, or death, in what sense are one's unfortunate circumstances unfair or unjust? How can claims against others for aid and support arise if no one has caused the unfortunate state of affairs? To justify the languages of fights to health care or justice in health care requires showing why particular unfortunate circumstances are also unfair, in the sense of demanding the labors of others. It requires understanding as well the limits of property claims. After all, claims regarding justice in health care or about fights to health care limit the property fights of those whose resources will be used to provide care.

Victims in the War on Crime

The Use and Abuse of Victims' Rights

Victims in the War on Crime

Two phenomena have shaped American criminal law for the past thirty years: the war on crime and the victims' rights movement. As incapacitation has replaced rehabilitation as the dominant ideology of punishment, reflecting a shift from an identification with defendants to an identification with victims, the war on crime has victimized offenders and victims alike. What we need instead, Dubber argues, is a system which adequately recognizes both victims and defendants as persons. Victims in the War on Crime is the first book to provide a critical analysis of the role of victims in the criminal justice system as a whole. It also breaks new ground in focusing not only on the victims of crime, but also on those of the war on victimless crime. After first offering an original critique of the American penal system in the age of the crime war, Dubber undertakes an incisive comparative reading of American criminal law and the law of crime victim compensation, culminating in a wide-ranging revision that takes victims seriously, and offenders as well. Dubber here salvages the project of vindicating victims' rights for its own sake, rather than as a weapon in the war against criminals. Uncovering the legitimate core of the victims' rights movement from underneath existing layers of bellicose rhetoric, he demonstrates how victims' rights can help us build a system of American criminal justice after the frenzy of the war on crime has died down.