The Athenian Acropolis

History, Mythology, and Archaeology from the Neolithic Era to the Present

The Athenian Acropolis

A comprehensive study of the Acropolis.

Swastika over the Acropolis

Re-interpreting the Nazi Invasion of Greece in World War II

Swastika over the Acropolis

Swastika over the Acropolis is a major reinterpretation of the conduct and significance of the Greek campaign of 1941, and its place in the history of World War II.

Acropolis

The Wawel Plays

Acropolis

Although he never left his native Kraków except for relatively short periods, Stanisław Wyspiański (1869-1907) achieved worldwide fame, both as a painter, and Poland’s greatest dramatist of the first half of the twentieth century. Acropolis: the Wawel Plays, brings together four of Wyspiański’s most important dramatic works in a new English translation by Charles S. Kraszewski. All of the plays centre on Wawel Hill: the legendary seat of royal and ecclesiastical power in the poet’s native city, the ancient capital of Poland. In these plays, Wyspiański explores the foundational myths of his nation: that of the self-sacrificial Wanda, and the struggle between King Bolesław the Bold and Bishop Stanisław Szczepanowski. In the eponymous play which brings the cycle to an end, Wyspiański carefully considers the value of myth to a nation without political autonomy, soaring in thought into an apocalyptic vision of the future. Richly illustrated with the poet’s artwork, Acropolis: the Wawel Plays also contains Wyspiański’s architectural proposal for the renovation of Wawel Hill, and a detailed critical introduction by the translator. In its plaited presentation of Bolesław the Bold and Skałka, the translation offers, for the first time, the two plays in the unified, composite format that the poet intended, but was prevented from carrying out by his untimely death.

In the Shadow of the Acropolis

In the Shadow of the Acropolis

Julia is an Australian woman who was apprehended by police in Athens. She was incarcerated in Korydallos Prison as she struggled to prove her innocence. Julia shared her life with women who had committed petty crimes as well as those who had committed gruesome murders. She valiantly concentrated on making the best of her adverse circumstances, never losing sight of the day she would walk out through the prison gates and back into the freedom she had lost. Her health suffers, and she overcomes a distressing accident, but she never gives up hope. This ordeal completely changes her outlook on life forever.

Acropolis

Acropolis


Beyond the Acropolis

A Rural Greek Past

Beyond the Acropolis

Beneath the cultural peaks of Ancient Greece lay the basic agricultural economy that made civilization possible. This book studies Greek country life from its earliest beginnings to the recent past, revealing a sequence of geological, geographical, cultural, and economic images spanning some 50,000 years of human settlement and land use.

Stymphalos

The Acropolis Sanctuary

Stymphalos

The buildings and artefacts uncovered by Canadian excavations at Stymphalos (1994–2001) shed light on the history and cult of a small sanctuary on the acropolis of the ancient city. The thirteen detailed studies collected in Stymphalos: The Acropolis Sanctuary illuminate a variety of aspects of the site. Epigraphical evidence confirms that both Athena and Eileithyia, goddess of childbirth, were worshipped in the sanctuary between the fourth and second centuries BCE. The temple and service buildings are modest in size and materials, but the temple floor and pillar shrine suggest that certain stones and bedrock outcrops were held as sacred objects. Earrings, finger rings, and other jewelry, along with almost 100 loomweights, indicate that women were prominent in cult observances. Many iron projectile points (arrowheads and catapult bolts) suggest that the sanctuary was destroyed in a violent attack around the mid-second century, possibly by the Romans. A modest sanctuary in a modest Arcadian city-state, the acropolis sanctuary at Stymphalos will be a major point of reference for all archaeologists and historians studying ancient Arcadia and all southern Greece in the future.

Watercolors of the Acropolis

Émile Gilliéron in Athens

Watercolors of the Acropolis

In the days before color photography, hand-colored drawings and photographs were the principal means of documenting polychrome Greek art. Beginning in the late 1870s, Émile Gilliéron recorded major archaeological discoveries in Greece shortly after their excavation. This Bulletin, accompanying an exhibition of five watercolors by Gilliéron, features the Swiss draftsman’s drawings of sculptures from the Athenian Acropolis. On view for decades after their acquisition, Gilliéron’s watercolors were eventually retired to The Met's basement, likely in the late 1940s, before the advent of modern conservation practices. Reproductions and copies fell out of fashion, and Gilliéron’s work remained in storage until 2015. In addition to telling the story of the watercolors during Gilliéron’s time, this Bulletin follows the conservators’ heroic efforts to rehabilitate these forgotten pieces. Images of the conserved watercolors, published here for the first time, provide fascinating insight into the sculptures found at the Acropolis as they appeared when they were first unearthed around the turn of the century.