Life of Albert Pike (c)

Life of Albert Pike (c)

This schoolteacher, newspaperman, lawyer, Whig leader, and Confederate general was also Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite for more than thirty years and "completely transformed and popularized the Masonic movement in the American South and Far West."--Jacket.

The Life of John Lothrop Motley

The Life of John Lothrop Motley

The life of John Lothrop Motley is a subject that has been too long ignored by biographers. Certainly, he is one of our most distinguished authors and, in the opinion of this writer, he can be fairly ranked in eminence to the historian of the Mexican Conquest, William H. Pres cott. To a large extent, Motley's adult life revolved around some of the most important and curious scenes of American history, particularly the Civil War. During this time he held the post of an Ambassador of the United States, and, by his individual efforts, aided substantially the Federal war effort. It is chiefly, however, as an Historian that Motley deserves to be recommended to the attention of the public. Motley's theme was the struggle for national and individual human liberty, which, as he conceived it, was the greatest of human blessings. The story of The Rise of The Dutch Republic, against one of the greatest tyrannies, both political and religious, ever exercised by men over men, is not only one the great stories of history, but reflects perfectly Motley's own high of aspirations for his fellow-man.

To the End of the Earth

A History of the Crypto-Jews of New Mexico

To the End of the Earth

In 1981, while working as New Mexico State Historian, Stanley M. Hordes began to hear stories of Hispanos who lit candles on Friday night and abstained from eating pork. Puzzling over the matter, Hordes realized that these practices might very well have been passed down through the centuries from early crypto-Jewish settlers in New Spain. After extensive research and hundreds of interviews, Hordes concluded that there was, in New Mexico and the Southwest, a Sephardic legacy derived from the converso community of Spanish Jews. In To the End of the Earth, Hordes explores the remarkable story of crypto-Jews and the tenuous preservation of Jewish rituals and traditions in Mexico and New Mexico over the past five hundred years. He follows the crypto-Jews from their Jewish origins in medieval Spain and Portugal to their efforts to escape persecution by migrating to the New World and settling in the far reaches of the northern Mexican frontier. Drawing on individual biographies (including those of colonial officials accused of secretly practicing Judaism), family histories, Inquisition records, letters, and other primary sources, Hordes provides a richly detailed account of the economic, social and religious lives of crypto-Jews during the colonial period and after the annexation of New Mexico by the United States in 1846. While the American government offered more religious freedom than had the Spanish colonial rulers, cultural assimilation into Anglo-American society weakened many elements of the crypto-Jewish tradition. Hordes concludes with a discussion of the reemergence of crypto-Jewish culture and the reclamation of Jewish ancestry within the Hispano community in the late twentieth century. He examines the publicity surrounding the rediscovery of the crypto-Jewish community and explores the challenges inherent in a study that attempts to reconstruct the history of a people who tried to leave no documentary record.

The Harvey Girls

Women Who Opened the West

The Harvey Girls

The award-winning history of the women who went West to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe railway--and went on to shape the American Southwest From the 1880s to the 1950s, the Harvey Girls went west to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe railway. At a time when there were "no ladies west of Dodge City and no women west of Albuquerque," they came as waitresses, but many stayed and settled, founding the struggling cattle and mining towns that dotted the region. Interviews, historical research, and photographs help re-create the Harvey Girl experience. The accounts are personal, but laced with the history the women lived: the dust bowl, the depression, and anecdotes about some of the many famous people who ate at the restaurants--Teddy Roosevelt, Shirley Temple, Bob Hope, to name a few. The Harvey Girls was awarded the winner of the 1991 New Mexico Press Women's ZIA award.

Santa Fe Dead

Santa Fe Dead

#1 New York Times bestselling author Stuart Woods returns with the third fast-paced thriller featuring Santa Fe, New Mexico’s take-no-prisoners attorney Ed Eagle... When his black widow wife failed to take him out in her murder for hire plot, Ed Eagle figured he was in the clear. But now that Barbara has escaped from police custody, Ed knows that his life, the life of his new girlfriend and, of course, any rich man unlucky enough to be lured into Barbara’s web, is in extreme danger. To add to his troubles, Ed has taken on a new client, Don Wells, who may or may not have murdered his own wife and son. From the posh resorts of southern California to the New Mexico desert and the seedy hotels of Tijuana, Ed Eagle will follow every lead—and hope that he doesn’t wind up Santa Fe dead.

Paradise General

Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq

Paradise General

IN 2004, AT THE AGE OF FORTY-EIGHT, DR. DAVE HNIDA, a family physician from Littleton, Colorado, volunteered to be deployed to Iraq and spent a tour of duty as a battalion surgeon with a combat unit. In 2007, he went back—this time as a trauma chief at one of the busiest Combat Support Hospitals (CSH) during the Surge. In an environment that was nothing less than a modern-day M*A*S*H, the doctors’ main objective was simple: Get ’em in, get ’em out. The only CSH staffed by reservists— who tended to be older, more-experienced doctors disdainful of authority—the 399th soon became a medevac destination of choice because of its high survival rate, an astounding 98 percent. This was fast-food medicine at its best: working in a series of tents connected to the occasional run-down building, Dr. Hnida and his fellow doctors raced to keep the wounded alive until they could be airlifted out of Iraq for more extensive repairs. Here the Hippocratic Oath superseded that of the pledge to Uncle Sam; if you got the red-carpet helicopter ride, his team took care of you, no questions asked. On one stretcher there might be a critically injured American soldier while three feet away lay the insurgent, shot in the head, who planted the IED that inflicted those wounds. But there was levity amid the chaos. On call round-the-clock with an unrelenting caseload, the doctors’ prescription for sanity included jokes, pranks, and misbehavior. Dr. Hnida’s deployment was filled with colorful characters and gifted surgeons, a diverse group who became trusted friends as together they dealt with the psychological toll of seeing the casualties of war firsthand. In a conflict with no easy answers and even less good news, Paradise General gives us something that we can all believe in—the story of an ordinary citizen turned volunteer soldier trying to make a difference. With honesty and candor, and an off-the-wall, self-deprecating humor that sustained him and his battle buddies through their darkest hours, Dr. Hnida delivers a devastating and inspiring account of his CSH tour and an unparalleled look at medical care during an unscripted war.