20 Most Asked Questions about the Amish and Mennonites

20 Most Asked Questions about the Amish and Mennonites

Sensitively answers the most common inquiries about Amish and Mennonite peoples. Authoritative, sympathetic, and thorough. 20 Most Asked Questions looks at origins, dress, pacifism, education, weddings, funerals, and food, as well as many other facets of Amish and Mennonite life. This book has sold more than 200,000 copies. 1. What is the difference between the Amish and the Mennonites? 2. When and how did these people get started? 3. Are they a Christian group or do they represent a different religion? 4. Aren’t they a bit naive and backward? Why don’t they accept modern things? 5. Does anyone ever join them? Does anyone ever leave? 6. Why do they dress that way? 7. Is it true they don’t go to war? 8. Why are they against education? 9. Why are they such good farmers? 10. Why don’t they pay Social Security taxes? 11. Do any of the Amish or Mennonite groups believe in missions? 12. What are their weddings like? 13. How are their women and children treated? 14. Is food a part of their religion? 15. Do they go to doctors and hospitals? 16. What about burial? 17. Don’t they believe in having fun? 18. What are some of their problems? 19. Are they growing or dying in number? 20. What, in fact, holds them together?

Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Choice


Mennonites and Media: Mentioned in It, Maligned by It, and Makers of It

How Mennonites Have Been Portrayed in Media and How They Have Shaped Media for Identity and Outreach

Mennonites and Media: Mentioned in It, Maligned by It, and Makers of It

Anabaptists and Mennonites have often been the subject of media scrutiny: sometimes admired, at other times maligned. Luther called them schwarmar, a German word meaning "fanatics" that alludes to a swarm of bees. In contrast, American independent film producer John Sayles drew inspiration from Mennonite conscientious objectors for his 1987 award-winning film, Matewan. Voltaire's Candide features a virtuous Anabaptist. Oscar Wilde's play The Importance of Being Earnest contains an Anabaptist reference. An Anabaptist chaplain is central to Joseph Heller's antiwar classic, Catch-22. President Lincoln and General Stonewall Jackson both had something to say about Mennonites. Garrison Keillor tells Mennonite jokes. These are just a few of the dozens of fascinating media references, dating from the early 1500s through the present, which are chronicled and analyzed here. Mennonites, although often considered media-shy, have in fact used media to great advantage in shaping their faith and identity. Beginning with the Martyrs Mirror, this book examines the writings of Mennonite authors John Howard Yoder, Donald Kraybill, Rudy Wiebe, Rhoda Janzen, and Malcolm Gladwell. Citing books, film, art, theater, and Ngram, the online culturomic tool developed by Harvard University and Google, the author demonstrates that Mennonites "punch above their weight class" in the media, and especially in print.

Haunts of Violence in the Church

Haunts of Violence in the Church

A critique of the "just war" doctrine first espoused by Saint Augustine and a recounting of the history of violence in the Christian Church. The author argues that war and violence are both perversions of the true teachings of Jesus Christ.

Best of Amish Cooking

Traditional And Contemporary Recipes Adapted From The Kitchens And Pantries Of O

Best of Amish Cooking

Recipes adapted form the kitchens and pantries of Amish cooks. Presented in their historical setting. Beautiful color photos. Delicious, savory recipes. Better Homes and Gardens Books Club. Featured by Book of the Month Club. Better Homes and Gardens Cook Books Club. This beautiful book by a leading expert on Amish cooking highlights traditional and contemporary recipes adapted from the kitchens and pantries of Amish cooks. Phyllis Pellman Good has spent years researching these foods. She has interviewed Amish grandmothers and dipped into old books, diaries, and recipe boxes. The dishes she selected are ones that were and continue to be popular in eastern Pennsylvania, usually in the Lancaster area. According to Good, they reflect the fruitfulness of Amish fields and gardens, as well as the group's emphasis on family and community. Wonderful descriptions and introductions prepare the setting. And delicious, savory recipes fill this book with some of the best food you'll find anywhere. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Good Books and Arcade imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of cookbooks, including books on juicing, grilling, baking, frying, home brewing and winemaking, slow cookers, and cast iron cooking. We’ve been successful with books on gluten-free cooking, vegetarian and vegan cooking, paleo, raw foods, and more. Our list includes French cooking, Swedish cooking, Austrian and German cooking, Cajun cooking, as well as books on jerky, canning and preserving, peanut butter, meatballs, oil and vinegar, bone broth, and more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

What Mennonites Are Thinking

What Mennonites Are Thinking

"Thought provoking and heart warming." -- Journal of Mennonite Studies Here is the third volume in an engaging series. Pointed and powerful, the book is a window into the souls of a people who intend to live with integrity, but are candid about the trouble it can be! "What Mennonites Are Thinking is a collection of various genres of literature: essays and articles, fiction, poetry, opinion and humor pieces, book reviews and film ratings. The writers come from a wide variety of Anabaptist-related groups--from Amish to Mennonite Brethren. Although mainly North Americans, a few writers from other continents are also included, thus giving the volume some international feeling." "Here is a sampling of the best in Mennonite writing in one volume." -- Mennonite Quarterly Review

What Mennonites Are Thinking 2001

What Mennonites Are Thinking 2001

"Thought provoking and heart warming." -- Journal of Mennonite Studies Here is the fourth volume in an engaging series. Pointed and powerful, the book is a window into the souls of a people who intend to live with integrity, but are candid about the trouble it can be! "What Mennonites Are Thinking is a collection of various genres of literature: essays and articles, fiction, poetry, opinion and humor pieces, book reviews and film ratings. The writers come from a wide variety of Anabaptist-related groups--from Amish to Mennonite Brethren. Although mainly North Americans, a few writers from other continents are also included, thus giving the volume some international feeling." "Here is a sampling of the best in Mennonite writing in one volume." -- Mennonite Quarterly Review

Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly


The Amish

Current Issues and Historical Background

The Amish

The Amish movement, whose members live in 19 states of Canada and Central America are a mystery to just about everyone except themselves. Here is a group which has deliberately passed on just about everything modern society has to offer, extending as far as electricity, gasoline, television, automobiles and movies. Yet Amish children are not educationally deprived in any way and regularly score above average on standardised tests. This book presents background information including a bibliography on this most interesting movement and includes also a review of Supreme Court rulings related to the Amish.

Researching the Germans from Russia

Annotated Bibliography of the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection at the North Dakota Institute for Regional Studies, North Dakota State University Library, with a Listing of the Library Materials at the Germans from Russia Heritage Society

Researching the Germans from Russia